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Burlington County Public Health Profile Report

Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Self-Reported Presence in Home: Percentage, 2014

  • Burlington
    78.9
    95% Confidence Interval (71.5 - 86.3)
    State
    83.3
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Burlington Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless and poisonous gas that is produced by the incomplete burning of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels. CO exposure is often the result of improper ventilation or inhalation of exhaust fumes from cars, trucks and other vehicles, generators, or gas heaters. Although CO poisoning can almost always be prevented, every year more than 500 Americans die as a result of unintentional exposure to this toxic gas, and thousands more require medical care for non-fatal poisoning. CO poisoning can be prevented by the installation and maintenance of CO detectors/alarms, and the proper maintenance of heating systems. Important guidelines: -Install battery-operated or battery back-up CO detectors near every sleeping area in your home. -Check CO detectors regularly to be sure they are functioning properly.

How Are We Doing?

In 2014, 83.3 percent of N.J. residents reported they had a carbon monoxide detector in their home. This is higher than the 42% of homes reported by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to have a working CO alarm (1). (1) http://www.nfpa.org/news-and-research/news-and-media/press-room/news-releases/2014/nfpa-and-cpsc-announce-carbon-monoxide-alarm-safety-toolkit. Obtained July 18, 2016.

Note

Survey question: "A carbon monoxide or CO detector checks the level of carbon monoxide in your home. It is not a smoke detector. Do you have a CO detector in your home: yes; no; don't know/not sure ?"

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Self-Reported Presence in Home

Definition: Percent of NJ residents who self report having a carbon monoxide (CO) detector in their home.
Numerator: Number of people age 18 years and older reporting having a carbon monoxide (CO) detector in their home.
Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and older surveyed using relevant question.

Indicator Profile Report

Self-Reported Presence of Carbon Monoxide Detector in Home (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

09/14/2016
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sat, 16 December 2017 4:07:15 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

Content updated: Wed, 15 Nov 2017 07:52:40 EST