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Cape May County Public Health Profile Report

Seatbelt Usage: Estimated Percent, 2015

  • Cape May
    92.5%
    95% Confidence Interval (88.8% - 95.0%)
    State
    94.8%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Cape May Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of unintentional injury death in New Jersey and in the United States. Seat belt use can help to prevent injuries and death and the use of seat belts is mandatory in New Jersey.

How Are We Doing?

Seat belt use among adults 18 and over in New Jersey was about 95% in 2013.

What Is Being Done?

New Jersey's Seat Belt Law (NJS 39:3-76.2f) signed on January 18th, 2010 requires that all vehicle occupants must wear their seat belt regardless of seating position in a vehicle.

Healthy People Objective IVP-15:

Increase use of safety belts
U.S. Target: 92.4 percent

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Seatbelt Usage

Definition: Percentage of New Jersey adults aged 18 and over who use seatbelts in automobiles.
Numerator: Number of persons aged 18 and over who used seatbelts in automobiles.
Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and over in the sample survey

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults who Always Use Seat Belts in Automobiles (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/29/2017
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 18 December 2017 13:34:57 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

Content updated: Wed, 15 Nov 2017 07:52:40 EST