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Hunterdon County Public Health Profile Report: Quick Facts & Health Indicators

map of New Jersey showing county highlighted Hunterdon County
Health Services Division
For more information:
http://www.co.hunterdon.nj.us/health.html

County Seat: Flemington
Largest Municipalities: Raritan Twp, Readington, Clinton
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Quick Facts

Hunterdon County New Jersey
Population (2016) 124,676 8,944,469
% of NJ Population (2016) 1.4% 100%
Land Area (sq mi) 427.82 7,354.22
Persons per Sq. Mile (2016) 291.4 1,216.2
Total Births (2015) 916 102,199
Total Deaths (2015) 907 72,317

You can find more Hunterdon County Quick Facts at US Census Bureau






Health Insurance Coverage: Percent uninsured, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    4.7%
    95% Confidence Interval (4.2% - 5.2%)
    State
    10.0%
    U.S.
    10.9%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Lack of health insurance is strongly associated with lack of access to health care services, particularly preventive and primary care. The uninsured are significantly more likely to be in fair or poor health, to have unmet medical needs or surgical care, not to have had a physician or other health professional visit, and to lack satisfaction in quality of care received.

How Are We Doing?

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act beginning in 2014, a distinct decrease was seen in the proportion of uninsured persons in 2014 and again in 2015. The targets for persons under 19 years of age and Whites under 65 years of age were met in 2014, so new, more challenging targets have been set.

What Is Being Done?

NJ FamilyCare is a federal- and state-funded health insurance program created to help qualified New Jersey residents of any age access to affordable health insurance. NJ FamilyCare is for people who do not have employer insurance. Beginning January 2014, NJ FamilyCare - New Jersey's publicly funded health insurance program - includes CHIP, Medicaid and Medicaid expansion populations. That means qualified NJ residents of any age may be eligible for free or low cost health insurance that covers doctor visits, prescriptions, vision, dental care, mental health and substance use services and even hospitalization.

Healthy People Objective AHS-1.1:

Increase the proportion of persons with health insurance: Medical insurance
U.S. Target: 100 percent

Related Indicators

Health Care System Factors:


Note

The margins of error used in SAHIE are 90% confidence levels.

Data Sources

US Census Bureau, Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE), [https://www.census.gov/did/www/sahie/index.html]  

Measure Description for Health Insurance Coverage

Definition: Percentage of New Jersey residents without health insurance coverage
Numerator: Number of persons surveyed who did not have health insurance coverage at the time of the interview
Denominator: Total number of persons in the survey sample

Indicator Profile Report

Uninsured Persons (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

04/10/2017

For more information:

NJ State Health Assessment Data, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: nj.gov/health/shad, e-mail: njshad@doh.nj.gov




Personal Doctor or Health Care Provider: Percentage of Adults, 2011-2013

  • Hunterdon
    89.5%
    95% Confidence Interval (87.2% - 91.4%)
    State
    82.5%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

As each new health care need arises, an individual's first point of contact with the health care system is typically his or her personal doctor. In most cases a personal doctor can effectively and efficiently manage a patient's medical care because they understand that person's medical history and social background. Having a regular source of health care is also an indicator of overall access to care.

How Are We Doing?

In 2013, 81.4% (crude rate) of New Jerseyans reported having at least one person they think of as their personal doctor or health care provider. Lack of a primary care provider was more common among young adults, especially men aged 18 to 34 (only 59.8% reported having a personal doctor in 2013).

Healthy People Objective AHS-3:

Increase the proportion of people with a usual primary care provider
U.S. Target: 83.9 percent
State Target: 90 percent

Note

Starting in 2011, BRFSS protocol requires that the NJBRFS incorporate a fixed quota of interviews from cell phone respondents along with a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting or "raking". The new weighting methodology incorporates additional demographic information (such as education, race, and marital status) in the weighting process. These methodological changes were implemented to account for the underrepresentation of certain demographic groups in the land line sample (which resulted in part from the increasing number of U.S. households without land line phones). Comparisons between 2011 and prior years should therefore be made with caution. (More details about these changes can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6122a3.htm.) 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Personal Doctor or Health Care Provider

Definition: Percentage of adults who reported having one or more persons they think of as their personal doctor or health care provider.
Numerator: Number of adults who reported having at least one person they think of as their personal doctor or health care provider.
Denominator: Total number of adults interviewed during the same survey period.

Indicator Profile Report

At Least One Primary Provider (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

04/28/2014

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




First Trimester Prenatal Care: Percentage of Live Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    83.5%
    95% Confidence Interval (80.9% - 85.8%)
    State
    73.6%
    U.S.
    71.7%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Women who receive early and consistent prenatal care (PNC) increase their likelihood of giving birth to a healthy child. Health care providers recommend that women begin prenatal care in the first trimester of their pregnancy.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of mothers receiving first trimester prenatal care (PNC) had been about 75% for over a decade before increasing slightly between 2007 and 2014 to 79%. A change in data collection methods in 2015 resulted in sharp decline to 73.6%. There is a significant difference in onset of PNC by race/ethnicity with nearly 80% of White and Asian mothers receiving early PNC compared to less than 70% of Black and Hispanic mothers. First trimester PNC is positively correlated with age and education.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving birth outcomes.

Healthy People Objective MICH-10.1:

Prenatal care beginning in first trimester
U.S. Target: 77.9 percent
State Target: 79.4 percent

Note

Some other states do not report prenatal care onset for births to New Jersey residents that occurred in their state. Therefore, data for certain counties (most notably Salem, Hudson, and Warren County) have a relatively high proportion of records with unknown prenatal care onset that artificially lowers their first trimester PNC percentage.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for First Trimester Prenatal Care

Definition: Number of live births to pregnant women who received prenatal care in the first trimester as a percentage of the total number of live births.
Numerator: Number of live births to pregnant women who received prenatal care in the first trimester
Denominator: Number of live births

Indicator Profile Report

First Trimester Prenatal Care (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/06/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




No Prenatal Care: Percentage of Live Births, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    0.3%
    95% Confidence Interval (0.1% - 0.5%)
    State
    1.1%
    U.S.
    1.3%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Women who receive early and consistent prenatal care increase their likelihood of giving birth to a healthy child. Health care providers recommend that women begin prenatal care in the first trimester of their pregnancy.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of New Jersey mothers who do not receive prenatal care had been fairly steady at slightly above 1% through the past two decades. The addition of an explicit "Did Mother Receive Prenatal Care?" question in the new VIP birth registration system is mostly responsible for the increase to 1.4% in 2015. Rates for Whites, Hispanics, and Asians have remained fairly constant since 2000, however, the rate among Blacks has declined about 40% since then. Rates of no prenatal care vary widely by county from a low of 0.3% (Hunterdon) to a high of 2.3% (Essex).

What Is Being Done?

The Division of Family Health Services in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving birth outcomes. [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/]

Note

Some other states do not report prenatal care onset for births to New Jersey residents that occurred in their state. Therefore, data for certain counties (most notably Salem, Hudson, and Warren County) have a relatively high proportion of records with unknown prenatal care onset that may artificially lower their no PNC percentage.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for No Prenatal Care

Definition: Number of live births to pregnant women who did not receive prenatal care at any time during this pregnancy as a percentage of the total number of live births.
Numerator: Number of live births to pregnant women who received no prenatal care
Denominator: Total number of live births

Indicator Profile Report

No Prenatal Care (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/06/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Midwife-Attended Births: Percentage of Live Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    11.7%
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    6.7%
    U.S.
    8.5%
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Some expectant mothers choose to use a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) instead of a traditional physician for their birth experience. CNMs are advanced practice nurses with additional training in delivering babies and providing prenatal and postpartum care to women. CNMs must be Registered Nurses (RNs) and must hold a college degree, such as a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN).

How Are We Doing?

Certified Nurse Midwives are more likely to attend births to younger women, women who have had 3 or more previous deliveries, and women delivering at a freestanding birthing center or at home. Although the rate of deliveries by CNMs is higher for freestanding birthing centers and residences, the majority of deliveries attended by CNMs occur in hospitals (6,714 births in 2015). The CNM delivery rates among residents of Mercer and Atlantic Counties are more than double the rates in other New Jersey counties.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   National Vital Statistics Reports, NCHS, CDC  

Measure Description for Midwife-Attended Births

Definition: Besides the mother, the attendant at birth is the person primarily responsible for the delivery. A Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) is a person who is a registered nurse and who holds certification from the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM) or the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB) or its successors.
Numerator: Number of births attended by a Certified Nurse Midwife
Denominator: Total number of live births

Indicator Profile Report

Certified Nurse Midwife-Attended Births (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/27/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Cesarean Deliveries among Low Risk Women: Percentage of Low-Risk Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    23.1%
    95% Confidence Interval (18.5% - 28.4%)
    State
    31.0%
    U.S.
    25.8%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Reducing cesarean births among low-risk (full-term, singleton, and vertex presentation) women is a goal of the Healthy People 2020 initiative.

How Are We Doing?

The cesarean delivery rate among low risk New Jersey mothers declined in 2010 for the first time since the mid-1990s and in 2015 stood at 31% of births. The rate is slightly higher among Asian (34%) and Black (33%) mothers than among Hispanic (31%) and White (30%) mothers. Cesareans are performed more frequently among older mothers and among non-Medicaid recipients.

What Is Being Done?

The Department of Health tracks many indicators of safety and quality care in maternity hospitals, including cesarean delivery rates.

Healthy People Objective MICH-7.1:

Reduce cesarean births among low-risk (full-term, singleton, vertex presentation) women: Women with no prior cesarean births
U.S. Target: 23.9 percent
State Target: N/A

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Cesarean Deliveries among Low Risk Women

Definition: The low-risk cesarean delivery rate is the percentage of cesarean deliveries among nulliparous (first birth), term (37 completed weeks or more, based on the obstetric estimate), singleton (one fetus), vertex (head first) births
Numerator: Number of cesarean deliveries among nulliparous, full-term, singleton, vertex presentation births
Denominator: Total number of nulliparous, full-term, singleton, vertex presentation births

Indicator Profile Report

Low-Risk Cesarean Deliveries (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/08/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Vaginal Birth after Previous Cesarean: Percent of Live Births to Mothers with a Previous Cesarean, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    19.2%
    95% Confidence Interval (15.8% - 23.2%)
    State
    10.5%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Reducing cesarean births among low-risk (full-term, singleton, and vertex presentation) women with a prior cesarean birth is a goal of the Healthy People 2020 initiative. A reduction in the repeat cesarean rate indicates a corresponding increase in the rate of vaginal birth after previous cesarean (VBAC) deliveries.

How Are We Doing?

The VBAC rate rose rapidly and steadily throughout the early 1990s but peaked in 1996 and began a rapid decline. VBACs are much more common in some New Jersey counties than in others.

What Is Being Done?

The Department of Health statistically tracks many indicators of safety and quality care in maternity hospitals, including cesarean delivery rates. See [http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/professional/safequality.shtml Safety and Quality in Maternity Care] for more information.

Healthy People Objective MICH-7.2:

Reduce cesarean births among low-risk (full-term, singleton, vertex presentation) women: Prior cesarean birth
U.S. Target: 81.7 percent

Related Indicators

Health Care System Factors:


Note

Hudson, Salem, and Warren Counties each have a large proportion (> 10%) of records missing method of delivery. Interpret with caution.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Vaginal Birth after Previous Cesarean

Definition: A vaginal delivery by a mother who had a cesarean for one or more previous deliveries.
Numerator: Number of births delivered vaginally after a previous cesarean
Denominator: Total number of live births to mothers who previously had a cesarean

Indicator Profile Report

Vaginal Birth after Previous Cesarean (VBAC) (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

09/27/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Childhood Lead Testing Coverage: Percent Tested, 2013

  • Hunterdon
    71.9%
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    73.5%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Lead is a heavy metal that has been widely used in industrial processes and consumer products. When absorbed into the human body, lead can have damaging effects on the brain and nervous system, kidneys, and blood cells. Lead exposure is particularly hazardous for pre-school children because their brains and nervous systems are still rapidly developing. Serious potential effects of lead exposure on the nervous system include: learning disabilities, hyperactivity, hearing loss and mental retardation. The primary method for lead to enter the body is through eating or breathing lead-containing substances. Major sources of lead exposure to children are: peeling or deteriorated leaded paint; lead-contaminated dust created by renovation or removal of lead-containing paint; and lead contamination brought home by adults who work in an occupation that involves lead, or who engage in a hobby where lead is used. Lead exposure can also occur through consuming drinking water or food which contains lead.

How Are We Doing?

Exposure to lead is measured by a blood test. New Jersey regulations require health care providers to test for lead exposure among all one- and two-year old children. The percent of children in New Jersey who were tested for lead exposure before 3 years of age increased from 65% for children born in 2000 to more than 73% for children born in 2013. The percentage of children tested for lead exposure before 3 years of age among children born in 2013 was highest in Essex (81.9%) and Passaic (75.4%) Counties. The lowest testing rates were in Gloucester (37.9%) and Burlington (45.9%) Counties.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health (NJ DOH) maintains a Child Health Program, [http://nj.gov/health/childhoodlead/]. This program coordinates a surveillance system that collects information from laboratories regarding the results of blood lead tests performed on children in New Jersey, identifies children with elevated test results, and notifies local health departments regarding children with elevated blood lead tests who reside in their jurisdiction.

Note

Lead poisoning testing counts and testing rates by county include only those children who could be assigned to a county. Among children born in 2013, <7% of children tested could not be assigned to a specific county.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Child Health Program, Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Childhood Lead Testing Coverage

Definition: Percent of New Jersey children tested for lead exposure before 36 months of age
Numerator: Number of children tested for lead exposure before 3 years of age, born in a specified year in a geographic area
Denominator: Number of live births to New Jersey resident mothers in a specified year in a geographic area

Indicator Profile Report

Percent of Children Tested for Lead Poisoning Before 3 Years of Age (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/24/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Breast Cancer Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2014-2015

  • Hunterdon
    82.6%
    95% Confidence Interval (77.3% - 86.9%)
    State
    78.7%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

About one in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer during their lifetime and this risk increases with age. A mammogram is an X-ray picture of the breast and is the most accurate tool for detecting breast cancer. Health care providers use a mammogram to look for early signs of breast cancer.

Risk and Resiliency Factors

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, risk factors for breast cancer include: older age (>50 years); genetic mutations (e.g., BRCA1 and BRCA2); early age at menstruation (<12 years); no or late (>30 years) pregnancy; late age at menopause (>55 years); lack of physical activity; being overweight or obese after menopause; having dense breasts; using combination hormone therapy (i.e., estrogen and progestin together); taking oral contraceptives; personal or family history of breast cancer; personal history of certain non-cancerous breast diseases (e.g., atypical hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ); previous radiation therapy to chest or breasts (e.g., like for treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma) before age 30 years; alcohol consumption. Women who took diethylstilbestrol (DES) during pregnancy and women whose mothers took DES are also at increased risk for breast cancer.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of New Jersey women who are current with breast cancer screening recommendations has remained stable for over the last five years.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Cancer Education and Early Detection (NJCEED) Program provides comprehensive outreach, education and screening services for breast, cervical, colorectal and prostate cancers. The services provided by NJCEED include: *Education *Outreach *Screening *Case Management *Tracking *Follow-up *Facilitation into Treatment

Healthy People Objective C-17:

Increase the proportion of women who receive a breast cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines
U.S. Target: 81.1 percent
State Target: 87.5 percent

Note

Estimates are age-adjusted using the 2000 U.S. standard population. 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Breast Cancer Screening

Definition: Estimated percentage of New Jersey women aged 50 to 74 years who reported having a mammogram in the last two years.
Numerator: The number of women 50 to 74 years or older who reported having a mammogram in the last two years.
Denominator: The total number of female survey respondents aged 50 to 74 excluding those who responded "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Females Aged 50 to 74 Who Reported Having a Mammogram in the Past Two Years (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/11/2017

For more information:

Office of Cancer Control and Prevention, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, web: nj.gov/health/ccp/index.shtml




Cervical Cancer Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2014-2015

  • Hunterdon
    82.5%
    95% Confidence Interval (71.8% - 89.7%)
    State
    84.0%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Cervical cancer is one of the most curable cancers if detected early through routine screening. Almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by infection with high-risk types of the human papillomavirus (HPV). The HPV vaccine protects against the HPV types that most often cause cervical cancer. Women who have had an HPV vaccine still need to have routine Pap smears because the vaccine does not fully protect against all the strains of the virus and other risk factors that can cause cervical cancer. HPV is transmitted through sexual contact. Any woman who is sexually active is at risk for developing cervical cancer. Other risk factors include giving birth to many children, having sexual relations at an early age, having multiple sex partners or partners with many other partners, cigarette smoking, and use of oral contraceptives. Cervical cancer screening should begin about three years after a woman begins having intercourse but no later than 21 years of age. Cervical screening should be performed every year with conventional Pap tests or every two years with liquid-based Pap tests. Beginning at age 30, women who have had three normal test results in a row may undergo screening every two to three years.

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, approximately 84 percent of respondents reported that they had received a Pap test within the past three years.

Healthy People Objective C-15:

Increase the proportion of women who receive a cervical cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines
U.S. Target: 93.0 percent

Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Cervical Cancer Screening

Definition: Estimated percentage of women ages 21-65 years who have had a Pap test in the past three years.
Numerator: The number of women ages 21-65 years who reported having a Pap test in the last three years.
Denominator: The total number of female survey respondents ages 21-65 years excluding those who responded "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adult Women who had a Pap Test Within the Past Three Years (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/11/2017

For more information:

Office of Cancer Control and Prevention, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, web: nj.gov/health/ccp/index.shtml




Colorectal Cancer Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2012-2014 (Even Years)

  • Hunterdon
    71
    95% Confidence Interval (66.1 - 75.4)
    State
    65.4
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

The fecal occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy are important tools in the detection of various health conditions, especially cancer of the colon and rectum. Colorectal cancer is unfortunately relatively common, does not have symptoms in its early stages, and has a risk that increases with age. Regular colorectal cancer screening is one of the most effective means by which colorectal cancer can be prevented or found early, when treatment is easier. Such screening helps people stay healthy and protects lives. The majority of diagnoses of this type of cancer occur in people who are over the age of 50. As a result, most people are advised to begin receiving these screening tests at age 50. Screening for hidden blood in the stool, using the fecal occult blood test, results in the detection of colorectal cancer at relatively high rates. Additionally, widespread use of this non-invasive, annual test has been shown to decrease both incidence and mortality in randomized controlled trials. By contrast, sigmoidoscopy is a minimally invasive test which uses a tiny video camera to examine the structure of the rectum and the lower part of the colon to find any abnormal areas. A sigmoidoscopy is usually performed only once every 5 years, depending on one's personal risk for colorectal cancer, but is also proven to decrease colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Although this is a more involved procedure, sigmoidoscopy does have an enhanced ability, when compared to the fecal occult blood test, to find both cancer and colorectal polyps. Polyps are small growths which can over time become cancer, if left in place. Any polyps that are discovered can immediately be extracted through the medical device used for a sigmoidoscopy to prevent possible progression to cancer or to better assess whether or not any cancer is currently present.

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Colorectal cancer risk increases with age, inflammatory bowel disease, a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, and certain hereditary syndromes. A diet high in fat and low in fiber, lack of regular physical activity, obesity, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking are also thought to increase risk. A diet high in fruits and vegetables, hormone replacement therapy in post-menopausal women, and aspirin use may reduce colorectal cancer risk.

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, approximately 66 percent of New Jersey adults aged 50-75 reported being current with colorectal cancer screening recommendations.

What Is Being Done?

A fecal occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy are recommended by the Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan 2008-2012. The Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan 2008-2012 has been developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness, and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents.

Healthy People Objective C-16:

Increase the proportion of adults who receive a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines
U.S. Target: 70.5 percent

Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Colorectal Cancer Screening

Definition: Estimated percentage of New Jersey adults ages 50-75 years who are current with colorectal cancer screening recommendations. An individual is considered current if they have had a take-home fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or high-sensitivity fecal occult blood test (FOBT) within the past year, and/or a flexible sigmoidoscopy within the past 5 years with a take-home FIT/FOBT within the past 3 years, and/or a colonoscopy within the past ten years.
Numerator: Number of New Jersey adults aged 50-75 years who reported that they are current with colorectal cancer screening recommendations.
Denominator: The total number of survey respondents aged 50-75 excluding those who answered "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Indicator Profile Report

Percent of Adults Ages 50-75 who are Current with Colorectal Cancer Screening Recommendations (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/11/2017

For more information:

Office of Cancer Control and Prevention, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, web: nj.gov/health/ccp/index.shtml




Prostate Cancer Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), New Jersey, 2014-2015

  • Hunterdon
    28.4%
    95% Confidence Interval (23.1% - 34.4%)
    State
    23.9%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Prostate cancer is the most commonly occurring form of cancer (excluding skin cancer) among men and is the second leading cause of cancer death for men in New Jersey and the U.S. All men over 40 should visit their doctor for a routine health visit which may include a discussion on prostate health.

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, 24% of New Jersey men aged 40 and over reported that a doctor, nurse, or other health professional have talked to them about the advantages and disadvantages of the PSA test.

Healthy People Objective C-19:

Increase the proportion of men who have discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to screen for prostate cancer with their health care provider
U.S. Target: 15.9 percent
State Target: 24.4 percent

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Prostate Cancer Screening

Definition: The percentage of men aged 40 and above who have discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to screen for prostate cancer with their health care provider.
Numerator: The number of men aged 40 and above who have discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to screen for prostate cancer with their health care provider.
Denominator: The total number of male survey respondents aged 40 or older excluding those who responded "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Men Aged 40+ Who Reported a Health Professional Has Talked with them about the Advantages and Disadvantages of the PSA Test (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/11/2017

For more information:

Office of Cancer Control and Prevention, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, web: nj.gov/health/ccp/index.shtml




Cholesterol Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2011-2015 (Odd Years)

  • Hunterdon
    81.8%
    95% Confidence Interval (77.5% - 85.5%)
    State
    79.7%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Cholesterol testing is considered a necessary preventive health care measure. High blood cholesterol has been linked to hardening of the arteries, heart disease, as well an increased risk of death from heart attacks.

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, approximately 82% of New Jersey adults have had their blood cholesterol checked by a health professional within the past five years. Hispanics (74.3%) have a significantly lower prevalence of cholesterol screenings compared to Blacks (84.8%), Asians (83.3%) and Whites.

What Is Being Done?

The National Diabetes Education Program has instituted the ABC campaign which promotes the screening for A1c (blood glucose), Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol as monitoring measures to help control diabetes and heart disease. Heart disease is a major complication of diabetes and the Department of Health has suggested that target values for A1c , Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol be established by health providers in partnership with patients based on their individual circumstances.

Healthy People Objective HDS-6:

Increase the proportion of adults who have had their blood cholesterol checked within the preceding 5 years
U.S. Target: 82.1 percent (age-adjusted)
State Target: 86.7 percent (age-adjusted)

Measure Description for Cholesterol Screening

Definition: Proportion of adults aged 18 and older who have had their blood cholesterol checked by a health professional within the past five years.
Numerator: Number of persons aged 18 and over interviewed for this survey who reported that they have had their blood cholesterol level checked in the past five years
Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and older interviewed during the same survey period

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults Aged 18+ Who Reported Having Their Cholesterol Checked Within the Past Five Years (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/25/2016

For more information:

Community Health and Wellness, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ 08625, Phone: 609-292-8540, Web: http://nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/index.shtml




Hemoglobin Screening Among Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes: Estimated Percent, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    53.7%
    95% Confidence Interval (30.9% - 75.0%)
    State
    61.7%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Proper diabetes management requires regular monitoring of blood sugar levels. Glucometers provide immediate feedback on blood sugar levels. An A1C test, however, tells a person what his or her average blood sugar level has been over the past two or three months and is a more reliable indicator of blood sugar control. An A1C level indicates the amount of sugar that is attached to red blood cells (hemoglobin cells). Red blood cells are replaced every two or three months and sugar stays attached to the cells until they die. When levels of blood sugar are high, more sugar is available to attach to red blood cells. For most people with diabetes, the target A1C level is less than 7 percent. Higher levels suggest that a change in therapy may be needed. Therefore, obtaining regular A1C tests plays an important role in diabetes management. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes have an A1C test at least two times a year. However, the test should be conducted more often for individuals who are not meeting target blood sugar goals, or who have had a recent change in therapy. (See http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/27/suppl_1/s15#T7)

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, 63.6% of New Jersey adults with diagnosed diabetes had at least two glycosylated hemoglobin measurement a year. Hispanics have a substantially lower screening rate (55%) compared to Whites (72.5%), Blacks (60.9%), and Asians (75.3%).

What Is Being Done?

The National Diabetes Education Program has instituted the ABC campaign which promotes the screening for A1c (blood glucose), Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol as monitoring measures to help control diabetes and heart disease. The Department of Health has suggested that target values for A1c , Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol be established by health providers in partnership with patients based on their individual circumstances.

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Starting in 2011, BRFSS protocol requires that the NJBRFS incorporate a fixed quota of interviews from cell phone respondents along with a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting or "raking". The new weighting methodology incorporates additional demographic information (such as education, race, and marital status) in the weighting process. These methodological changes were implemented to account for the underrepresentation of certain demographic groups in the land line sample (which resulted in part from the increasing number of U.S. households without land line phones). Comparisons between 2011 and prior years should therefore be made with caution. (More details about these changes can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6122a3.htm.) All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Hemoglobin Screening Among Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes

Definition: Age-adjusted proportion of adults aged 18 years and older with diagnosed diabetes who self-reported having a glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) measurement at least twice a year.
Numerator: Number of persons with diagnosed diabetes interviewed for the survey who reported that they have had at least two A1C measurement in the year prior to being surveyed.
Denominator: Total number of persons with diagnosed diabetes interviewed during the same survey period.

Indicator Profile Report

Age-adjusted Glycosylated Hemoglobin Screening Rate among Adults Aged 18+ (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/25/2016

For more information:

Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 364, Trenton NJ 08625-0364, Phone: 609-984-6137, Fax: 609-292-9288, Web: http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/diabetes/index.shtml




Dilated Eye Exams Among Persons with Diabetes: Estimated Percent, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    37.6%
    95% Confidence Interval (32.2% - 43.3%)
    State
    60.6%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Individuals with diabetes are at a greater risk for eye related health problems than those without diabetes. A dilated eye exam tests for diabetic retinopathy which is the leading cause of blindness in American adults. Timely treatment and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic retinopathy can reduce the risk of blindness up to 95% according to the National Eye Institute.

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, 58.6% of adults with diagnosed diabetes reported that they had a dilated eye exam within the past year.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Human Services' Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired Diabetic Eye Disease Detection Program provides dilated eye exams for low income individuals who are uninsured or underinsured.

Healthy People Objective D-10:

Increase the proportion of adults with diabetes who have an annual dilated eye examination
U.S. Target: 58.7 percent (age-adjusted)
State Target: 72.2 percent (age-adjusted)

Note

Starting in 2011, BRFSS protocol requires that the NJBRFS incorporate a fixed quota of interviews from cell phone respondents along with a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting or "raking". The new weighting methodology incorporates additional demographic information (such as education, race, and marital status) in the weighting process. These methodological changes were implemented to account for the underrepresentation of certain demographic groups in the land line sample (which resulted in part from the increasing number of U.S. households without land line phones). Comparisons between 2011 and prior years should therefore be made with caution. (More details about these changes can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6122a3.htm.) All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Dilated Eye Exams Among Persons with Diabetes

Definition: Percentage of persons aged 18 years and older with diagnosed diabetes who have had a dilated eye exam within the past year.
Numerator: Number of persons aged 18 years and older with diagnosed diabetes interviewed for this survey who reported that they had a dilated eye exam within the past year
Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 years and older with diagnosed diabetes interviewed during the same survey period

Indicator Profile Report

Age-adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18+ with Diagnosed Diabetes Who had a Dilated Eye Exam Within the Past Year (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/25/2016

For more information:

Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 364, Trenton NJ 08625-0364, Phone: 609-984-6137, Fax: 609-292-9288, Web: http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/diabetes/index.shtml




Seatbelt Usage: Estimated Percent, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    96.5%
    95% Confidence Interval (95.0% - 97.5%)
    State
    94.8%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of unintentional injury death in New Jersey and in the United States. Seat belt use can help to prevent injuries and death and the use of seat belts is mandatory in New Jersey.

How Are We Doing?

Seat belt use among adults 18 and over in New Jersey was about 95% in 2013.

What Is Being Done?

New Jersey's Seat Belt Law (NJS 39:3-76.2f) signed on January 18th, 2010 requires that all vehicle occupants must wear their seat belt regardless of seating position in a vehicle.

Healthy People Objective IVP-15:

Increase use of safety belts
U.S. Target: 92.4 percent

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Seatbelt Usage

Definition: Percentage of New Jersey adults aged 18 and over who use seatbelts in automobiles.
Numerator: Number of persons aged 18 and over who used seatbelts in automobiles.
Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and over in the sample survey

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults who Always Use Seat Belts in Automobiles (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/29/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Cigarette Smoking Among Adults: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    10.6%
    95% Confidence Interval (7.8% - 14.4%)
    State
    15.2%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Tobacco use is one of the leading preventable causes of death and disease in the United States. Smoking claims nearly 440,000 lives each year. It has been shown that smoking increases the risk for chronic lung disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke, as well as cancer of the lungs, larynx, esophagus, mouth, and bladder. In addition, smoking contributes to cancer of the cervix, pancreas, and kidneys. Exposure to secondhand smoke increases the risk for heart disease and lung cancer among nonsmokers.

How Are We Doing?

Although New Jersey's smoking rates have decreased since its Master Settlement Agreement-funded programs were initiated, more than one million New Jersey adults continue to smoke. People with fewer years of formal education report higher rates of tobacco use compared to the general population. Comprehensive and free quitting services are needed to help New Jersey smokers quit and ensure a decline in tobacco use rates among all population groups.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/tobacco/ Office of Tobacco Control] at the New Jersey Department of Health and its partners use comprehensive programs to prevent the initiation of tobacco use among young people, to help tobacco users quit, to eliminate nonsmokers' exposure to secondhand smoke, and to reduce tobacco-related disparities. These programs include free quitting services, school- and community-based prevention programs and education regarding the [http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2004/Bills/PL05/383_.HTM New Jersey Smoke-Free Air Act].

Healthy People Objective TU-1.1:

Reduce tobacco use by adults: Cigarette smoking
U.S. Target: 12.0 percent (age-adjusted)
State Target: 15.4 percent (age-adjusted)

Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Cigarette Smoking Among Adults

Definition: Percentage of adults aged 18 years and older who smoke cigarettes every day or some days
Numerator: Number of adults aged 18 years and older who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and who now report smoking cigarettes every day or some days
Denominator: Number of adults aged 18 years and older

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults who Reported Current Cigarette Smoking (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/14/2017

For more information:

Office of Tobacco Control, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ, 08625, Phone: 609-984-3317, Web: http://www.state.nj.us/health/ctcp/index.shtml




Tobacco Use During Pregnancy: Percentage of Live Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    4.1%
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    4.7%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Use of tobacco products during pregnancy is associated with poor birth outcomes.

How Are We Doing?

Tobacco use during pregnancy increases the likelihood of delivering preterm (< 37 weeks gestation), at low birth weight (< 2500 g), and at very low birth weight (< 1500 g). The average birth weight of infants whose mothers used tobacco during pregnancy is 3,113 grams compared to 3,274 grams for those who abstained.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health has been committed to addressing perinatal addiction since 1980 and provides support to a system of perinatal addiction services. These risk reduction services include referral for treatment and education. For additional information about these services or for more information on the effects of substance use during pregnancy, please contact Reproductive and Perinatal Health Services at (609) 292-5616.

Healthy People Objective MICH-11.3:

Increase abstinence from alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs among pregnant women: Cigarette smoking
U.S. Target: 98.6 percent
State Target: N/A. HNJ objective was revised from abstinence to use.

Related Indicators

Risk Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Some neighboring states do not report all birth certificate items to NJDOH for residents who gave birth in their state, thereby creating a high proportion of records with unknown values for those items. In particular, Hudson, Salem, and Warren have high proportions of records with unknown tobacco use during pregnancy. This artificially lowers their Tobacco Use percentages to some unknown degree.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Tobacco Use During Pregnancy

Definition: Self-reported use of any tobacco product by the mother during pregnancy
Numerator: Number of live births whose mothers used any tobacco product
Denominator: Total number of live births

Indicator Profile Report

Tobacco Use During Pregnancy (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/06/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Maternal Marital Status: Percentage of Live Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    16.7%
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    33.1%
    U.S.
    40.3%
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Many birth outcomes vary considerably by marital status and are addressed in their respective indicator profiles.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of births to unmarried mothers (nonmarital birth rate) had been steadily increasing for several decades but peaked around 2010 and has been slowly declining since then. The largest differences between 1990 and 2015 were among White (61% increase) and Hispanic mothers (47%), while differences among Black (+4%) and Asian (-7%) mothers were more modest. The nonmarital birth rate more than doubled among those aged 25-44. Although the largest increase was seen among foreign-born mothers, infants born to mothers native to U.S. territories (predominantly Puerto Rico) still have the highest nonmarital birth rate. Nonmarital birth rates range from 15% in Morris to 61% in Cumberland County.

Note

Hudson, Salem, and Warren Counties each have a large proportion (> 10%) of records missing mother's marital status. Interpret with caution.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   National Vital Statistics Reports, NCHS, CDC  

Measure Description for Maternal Marital Status

Definition: Marital status was determined by response to the following questions on the birth certificate: For years 1970-1978 - Legitimate? For years 1979-1988 - Is mother married? For years after 1988 - Mother married? (At birth, conception, or any time between)
Numerator: Number of live births to unmarried mothers
Denominator: Total number of live births

Indicator Profile Report

Births to Unmarried Mothers (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/06/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Immunization - Influenza, Adults: Estimated Percent, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    60.2%
    95% Confidence Interval (49.5% - 69.9%)
    State
    60.7%
    U.S.
    60.8%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Influenza, or flu, is an acute viral infection involving the respiratory tract that can occur in epidemics or pandemics. Influenza can cause a person, especially older persons, to be more susceptible to bacterial pneumonia. Pneumonia and influenza together constitute the tenth leading cause of death (2009) among New Jersey residents; over 80% of these deaths occur in persons aged 65 and over.

How Are We Doing?

In 2013, 57% of all New Jersey adults aged 65 and older reported having received the influenza vaccination in the past 12 months. Flu vaccination is lower among Blacks (48.9%), Hispanics (56.1%), and Asians (63.5%) compared to Whites (58.6%).

What Is Being Done?

Since 1998, NJDOH has played a lead role in a statewide adult immunization campaign, collaborating with organizations such as the New Jersey Quality Improvement Organization (NJ-QIO), local health agencies, the provider community, long-term care facilities and hospitals to increase the influenza and pneumococcal vaccination rates among seniors statewide. NJDOH has adopted regulations requiring nursing homes to offer these two immunizations to all residents, and for hospitals to offer them to seniors who have been admitted for treatment. These measures, in combination with continued education and outreach, should improve coverage rates by 2010. The goal of the New Jersey State Strategic Plan on Aging, October 1, 2005-Oct 30, 2008 is to implement evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention programs including influenza vaccination among seniors.

Healthy People Objective IID-12.7:

Increase the percentage of children and adults who are vaccinated annually against seasonal influenza: Noninstitutionalized adults aged 65 years and older
U.S. Target: 90 percent
State Target: To be determined

Note

Starting in 2011, BRFSS protocol requires that the NJBRFS incorporate a fixed quota of interviews from cell phone respondents along with a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting or "raking". The new weighting methodology incorporates additional demographic information (such as education, race, and marital status) in the weighting process. These methodological changes were implemented to account for the underrepresentation of certain demographic groups in the land line sample (which resulted in part from the increasing number of U.S. households without land line phones). Comparisons between 2011 and prior years should therefore be made with caution. (More details about these changes can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6122a3.htm.) 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Immunization - Influenza, Adults

Definition: Percentage of adults aged 65+ who report receiving an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
Numerator: Number of survey respondents aged 65+ who report receiving an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
Denominator: Number of survey respondents aged 65+.

Indicator Profile Report

Influenza Vaccination in the Past 12 Months (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

02/02/2017

For more information:

Vaccine Preventable Disease Program, Communicable Disease Service, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ, 08625, Phone: 609-826-4860, Web: www.nj.gov/health/cd/




Immunizations - Pneumoccocal Vaccination: Estimated Percent, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    69.3%
    95% Confidence Interval (58.5% - 78.3%)
    State
    65.1%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection of the lungs, blood or outer lining of the brain. High death rates from pneumonia persist despite the existence of an effective vaccine against pneumococcus. (Note that not all pneumonia is caused by pneumococcus.). Relatively low rates of pneumococcal vaccination, particularly among the non-Hispanic Black population, are related to the high volume of deaths. Persons living in institutional settings are at particularly high risk.

How Are We Doing?

Lifetime pneumococcal vaccination rates for adults 65+ have significantly improved since 1999. The 1999 rate was 55%% (95% confidence interval, 50%-60%%) and by 2015 it had increased to 65% (61.6%-64.4%). However, due to a change in the BRFSS methodology in 2011, it is not possible to know if this is a significant change from 2010.

What Is Being Done?

Since 1998, NJDOH has adopted regulations requiring nursing homes to offer pneumococcal and influenza immunizations to all residents, and for hospitals to offer them to seniors who have been admitted for treatment. Education and outreach methods have also been made throughout the state.

Healthy People Objective IID-13.1:

Increase the percentage of adults who are vaccinated against pneumococcal disease: Noninstitutionalized adults aged 65 years and older
U.S. Target: 90 percent
State Target: To be determined

Note

Starting in 2011, BRFSS protocol requires that the NJBRFS incorporate a fixed quota of interviews from cell phone respondents along with a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting or "raking". The new weighting methodology incorporates additional demographic information (such as education, race, and marital status) in the weighting process. These methodological changes were implemented to account for the underrepresentation of certain demographic groups in the land line sample (which resulted in part from the increasing number of U.S. households without land line phones). Comparisons between 2011 and prior years should therefore be made with caution. (More details about these changes can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6122a3.htm.) 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Immunizations - Pneumoccocal Vaccination

Definition: Percentage of adults age 65+ who reported ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccination in their lifetime.
Numerator: Number of survey respondents age 65+ who reported ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccine anytime during their life
Denominator: Number of survey respondents age 65+

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults 65+ Who Reported Having Ever Received Pneumococcal Vaccination (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

12/02/2016

For more information:

Vaccine Preventable Disease Program, Communicable Disease Service, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ, 08625, Phone: 609-826-4860, Web: www.nj.gov/health/cd/




Physical Activity-Adult Prevalence: Estimated Percent, (2013, 2015)

  • Hunterdon
    57.6
    95% Confidence Interval (52.1 - 62.8)
    State
    49.2
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Maintenance of a physically active lifestyle is recognized in public health as one of the essential features of a healthy life. While it has long been known that physical activity can prevent heart disease, newer studies suggest that, on average, physically active persons outlive those who are inactive.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of people reporting that they get the recommended level of physical activity in 2015 was about 50%. The 2015 data shows that fewer (41%) Hispanics reported meeting the recommendation compared to Whites (56%), Blacks (47%) and Asians (47%).

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health coordinates efforts to work with communities to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that address behaviors related to increasing physical activity, breastfeeding initiation and duration, and the consumption of fruits and vegetables, and to decreasing the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and high-energy-dense foods, and to decrease television viewing.

Healthy People Objective PA-2.1:

Increase the proportion of adults who engage in aerobic physical activity of at least moderate intensity for at least 150 minutes/week, or 75 minutes/week of vigorous intensity, or an equivalent combination
U.S. Target: 47.9 percent

Related Indicators

Risk Factors:


Note

Physical activity questions are generally asked in odd years only. Starting in 2011, BRFSS protocol requires that the NJBRFS incorporate a fixed quota of interviews from cell phone respondents along with a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting or "raking". The new weighting methodology incorporates additional demographic information (such as education, race, and marital status) in the weighting process. These methodological changes were implemented to account for the underrepresentation of certain demographic groups in the land line sample (which resulted in part from the increasing number of U.S. households without land line phones). Comparisons between 2011 and prior years should therefore be made with caution. (More details about these changes can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6122a3.htm.) All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population. 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Physical Activity-Adult Prevalence

Definition: Among adults, the proportion who engage in aerobic physical activity of at least moderate intensity for at least 150 minutes/week, or 75 minutes/week of vigorous intensity, or an equivalent combination.
Numerator: Number of adults aged 18 years and older who meet aerobic physical activity recommendations of getting at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity activity, or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate-vigorous intensity activity.
Denominator: Number of surveyed adults aged 18 years and older (excludes unknowns or refusals ).

Indicator Profile Report

Age-adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18+ Who Meet Aerobic Physical Activity Recommendation (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/27/2016

For more information:

Community Health and Wellness, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ 08625, Phone: 609-292-8540, Web: http://nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/index.shtml




Children Under Five Years of Age Living in Poverty: Estimated Percent, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    4.4%
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    18.0%
    U.S.
    24.1%
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Poverty affects many aspects of a child's life, including living conditions, access to health care, and adequate nutrition, all of which contribute to health status. Poverty during childhood puts children at increased risk for living in run-down or poorly maintained older (pre-1950s) housing, and this increases a child's chances of exposure to chipped and peeling lead paint. Deteriorating lead paint (chipping, flaking, and peeling) and paint disturbed during home remodeling contributes to lead dust, contaminates bare soil around a home, and makes paint chips and dust-containing lead accessible. Children are more vulnerable to lead poisoning than adults. The first six years, particularly the first three years of life, is the time when the brain grows the fastest, and when the critical connections in the brain and nervous system are formed. The normal behavior of children at this age - crawling, exploring, teething, putting objects in their mouth - can put them in contact with lead that is present in their environment.

How Are We Doing?

Based upon 2015 American Community Survey 5-year estimates from the U.S. Census data, there were wide variations in the county rates of poverty among New Jersey children less than 5 years of age. Counties with the highest percentages of children living in poverty were Cumberland (29.8%), Atlantic (29.8%) Essex (29.7%) and Salem (29.3%%) Counties. The lowest percentages of poverty among children less than 5 years were in Morris (4.1%), Hunterdon (4.4%), and Somerset (7.1%) Counties.

Data Sources

American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau, [https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/]  

Measure Description for Children Under Five Years of Age Living in Poverty

Definition: Number or percent of children under 5 years of age living in poverty
Numerator: Number of children less than 5 years of age living in poverty in a geographic area
Denominator: Number of children less than 5 years of age living in a geographic area

Indicator Profile Report

Children Under Age 5 Living in Poverty (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/24/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Risk Factor for Childhood Lead Exposure: Pre-1950 and Pre-1980 Housing: Percent of Pre-1950 Housing Units, as of 2016

  • Hunterdon
    22.8%
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    25.8%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

While all children in New Jersey are at risk of exposure to lead, children who reside in homes build prior to 1950 are at highest risk for elevated blood lead due to the potential presence of leaded paint. In addition, children living in homes constructed prior to 1980 are at risk due to the fact that use of lead-based paint for residential homes was not discontinued until 1980. Major sources of lead exposure to children are: peeling or deteriorated leaded paint; lead-contaminated dust created by renovation or removal of lead-containing paint; and lead contamination brought home by adults who work in an occupation that involves lead, or who engage in a hobby where lead is used. Children are more vulnerable to lead poisoning than adults. The first six years of life are the time when the brain grows the fastest, and when the critical connections in the brain and nervous system that control thought, learning, hearing, movement, behavior and emotions are formed. The normal behavior of very young children (crawling, exploring, teething, and putting objects in their mouth) exposes young children to lead that is present in their environment.

How Are We Doing?

In 2016, New Jersey had approximately 930,000 housing units which were built before 1950. The number of housing units built before 1950 ranged from about 8,300 in Salem County to over 133,000 in Essex County. The percentage of housing units built before 1950 was highest in Hudson (44.7%), Essex (42.2%) and Union (40.1%) Counties. Ocean County had the lowest percentage of housing units built before 1950 (7.3%). Also in 2016, New Jersey had approximately 2.4 million housing units which were built before 1980. The number of housing units built before 1980 ranged from about 21,000 in Salem County to over 274,000 in Bergen County. The percentage of housing units built before 1980 was highest in Union (82.8%), Passaic (81.2%) and Essex (78.6%) Counties. Ocean County had the lowest percentage of housing units built before 1980 (49.7%).

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) maintains a Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, [http://nj.gov/health/childhoodlead/]. This program has a surveillance system that collects information from laboratories regarding the results of blood lead tests performed on children in New Jersey, identifies children with elevated test results, and notifies local health departments regarding children with elevated blood lead tests who reside in their jurisdiction.

Data Sources

American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau, [https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/]  

Measure Description for Risk Factor for Childhood Lead Exposure: Pre-1950 and Pre-1980 Housing

Definition: Number or percent of either pre-1950 or pre-1980 housing units
Numerator: Number of residential housing units built prior to 1950 or pre-1980 in a geographic area (based upon 2016 American Community Survey data)
Denominator: Number of residential housing units in a geographic area (based upon 2016 housing unit data from American Community Survey)

Indicator Profile Report

Housing in New Jersey (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/24/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Children under 3 Years of Age with a Confirmed Elevated Blood Lead Level: Percent with Confirmed Blood Lead >=5 ug/dL, Born in 2013

  • Hunterdon
    1.46
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    2.62
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Lead is a heavy metal that has been widely used in industrial processes and consumer products. When absorbed into the human body, lead can have damaging effects on the brain and nervous system, kidneys, and blood cells. Lead exposure is particularly hazardous for pre-school children because their brains and nervous systems are still rapidly developing. Serious potential effects of lead exposure on the nervous system include: learning disabilities, hyperactivity, hearing loss, and mental retardation. The primary method for lead to enter the body is through eating or breathing lead-containing substances. Major sources of lead exposure to children are: peeling or deteriorated leaded paint; lead-contaminated dust created by renovation or removal of lead-containing paint; and lead contamination brought home by adults who work in an occupation that involves lead, or who engage in a hobby where lead is used. Lead exposure can also occur through consuming drinking water or food which contains lead.

How Are We Doing?

Exposure to lead is measured by a blood test. New Jersey regulations require health care providers to test for lead exposure among all one- and two-year old children. An elevated blood lead level in children is currently defined in New Jersey as greater than or equal to 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (ug/dL). The lowering of the public health intervention level to 5 ug/dL was statutorily required under P.L. 2017, c.7 in February 2017. The NJ DOH's proposed amendments, new rules, and repeals are anticipated to be adopted August 2017 upon publication in the NJ Register. When we look at children born in 2013 statewide (i.e., the 2013 birth cohort), the percent of tested children who had a confirmed blood lead level greater or equal to 5 ug/dL before 3 years of age was highest in Essex, Cumberland, and Mercer Counties. When looking at that same birth cohort of children, the percent of tested children who had a confirmed blood lead level greater or equal to 10 ug/dL before 3 years of age was highest in Cumberland and Salem Counties. The percent of tested children with a confirmed elevated blood lead level greater or equal to 20 ug/dL before 3 years of age was highest in Essex, Middlesex, and Passaic Counties. When we look at children by year of testing, annual statewide blood lead levels in children tested between the years 2000 and 2016 show a decrease in the percentage of children having an elevated blood lead level >=5 ug/dL from a peak of 12% in 2003 to 2.2% in 2016. A similar decreasing trend is seen for children with elevated blood lead levels >=10 ug/dL, from 3.6% in 2000 to 0.5% in 2016. The same decreasing trend can be seen for children with blood lead >=20 ug/dL, from 0.7% in 2000 to 0.1% in 2016.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health (NJ DOH) maintains a Child Health Program, [http://nj.gov/health/childhoodlead/]. This program coordinates a surveillance system that collects information from laboratories regarding the results of blood lead tests performed on children in New Jersey, identifies children with elevated test results, and notifies local health departments regarding children with elevated blood lead tests who reside in their jurisdiction.

Measure Description for Children under 3 Years of Age with a Confirmed Elevated Blood Lead Level

Definition: Percent of New Jersey children under 3 years of age with confirmed elevated blood lead levels
Numerator: Number of children under 3 years of age with a confirmed elevated blood lead level in a geographic area
Denominator: Number of children under 3 years of age tested for lead exposure in a geographic area

Indicator Profile Report

Percent of Tested Children Under 3 Years of Age (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/24/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Self-Reported Presence in Home: Percentage, 2014

  • Hunterdon
    86.9
    95% Confidence Interval (80.3 - 93.4)
    State
    83.3
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless and poisonous gas that is produced by the incomplete burning of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels. CO exposure is often the result of improper ventilation or inhalation of exhaust fumes from cars, trucks and other vehicles, generators, or gas heaters. Although CO poisoning can almost always be prevented, every year more than 500 Americans die as a result of unintentional exposure to this toxic gas, and thousands more require medical care for non-fatal poisoning. CO poisoning can be prevented by the installation and maintenance of CO detectors/alarms, and the proper maintenance of heating systems. Important guidelines: -Install battery-operated or battery back-up CO detectors near every sleeping area in your home. -Check CO detectors regularly to be sure they are functioning properly.

How Are We Doing?

In 2014, 83.3 percent of N.J. residents reported they had a carbon monoxide detector in their home. This is higher than the 42% of homes reported by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to have a working CO alarm (1). (1) http://www.nfpa.org/news-and-research/news-and-media/press-room/news-releases/2014/nfpa-and-cpsc-announce-carbon-monoxide-alarm-safety-toolkit. Obtained July 18, 2016.

Note

Survey question: "A carbon monoxide or CO detector checks the level of carbon monoxide in your home. It is not a smoke detector. Do you have a CO detector in your home: yes; no; don't know/not sure ?"

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Self-Reported Presence in Home

Definition: Percent of NJ residents who self report having a carbon monoxide (CO) detector in their home.
Numerator: Number of people age 18 years and older reporting having a carbon monoxide (CO) detector in their home.
Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and older surveyed using relevant question.

Indicator Profile Report

Self-Reported Presence of Carbon Monoxide Detector in Home (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

09/14/2016

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Portable Generators: Self-Reported Ownership for Use during Power Outages: Percentage, 2014

  • Hunterdon
    52.8
    95% Confidence Interval (42.0 - 63.6)
    State
    24.9
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Little is known about the percentage of NJ residents who have purchased portable generators for use during power outages. Portable back-up generators produce colorless odorless carbon monoxide (CO) gas which can sicken or kill residents if generator exhaust is not properly vented. CO poisoning claims the lives of hundreds of people every year and makes thousands more ill. Important guidelines: PORTABLE GENERATORS: * Never use a generator inside your home or garage, even if doors and windows are open. * Only use generators outside, more than 20 feet away from your home, doors, and windows. CO DETECTORS: * Install battery-operated or battery back-up CO detectors near every sleeping area in your home. * Check CO detectors regularly to be sure they are functioning properly.

Note

Survey Question: "Do you own at least one portable generator which you plan to use to provide energy to your home during a power outage: yes; no; don't know/not sure?".

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for Portable Generators: Self-Reported Ownership for Use during Power Outages

Definition: Percent of NJ residents who self-report owning at least one portable generator for use to provide electricity to their home during a power outage.
Numerator: Number of people age 18 years and older self-reporting owning at least one portable generator for use to provide electricity to their home during a power outage.
Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and older interviewed during the same survey period.

Indicator Profile Report

Ownership of a Portable Generator for Use during Power Outages (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

09/14/2016

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Naphthalene in Outdoor Air: Mean Concentration (ug/m3), 2011 NATA

  • Hunterdon
    0.04
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    0.06
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Naphthalene has been used as a household fumigant, such as in mothballs or moth flakes. Large amounts of naphthalene are used as a chemical intermediate to produce other chemicals. Exposure to naphthalene happens mostly from breathing air contaminated from the burning of wood, tobacco, or fossil fuels, industrial discharges, or moth repellents. Exposure to high levels of naphthalene may damage or destroy red blood cells. Children and adults have developed this condition, known as hemolytic anemia, after ingesting mothballs or deodorant blocks containing naphthalene. Symptoms include fatigue, lack of appetite, nausea, restlessness, and pale skin. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies naphthalene as possibly carcinogenic to humans.

How Are We Doing?

Most New Jersey counties exceed the health benchmark of 0.029 micrograms of naphthalene per cubic meter of air. The highest ambient air concentration can be found in the northeast counties, as well as Mercer and Camden Counties.

What Is Being Done?

Industrial facilities that emit this chemical must obtain permits from the NJDEP Air Program and are also subject to state and federal air pollution control technology requirements.

Note

Data Source: National-scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), 2011 and NJDEP Division of Air Quality 

Data Sources

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)   Bureau of Air Monitoring, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection  

Measure Description for Naphthalene in Outdoor Air

Definition: Mean of modeled annual average naphthalene concentration for census tracts in a county using 2011 NATA data
Numerator: Modeled mean naphthalene concentration in micrograms per cubic meter
Denominator: N/A

Indicator Profile Report

Naphthalene Concentrations in Outdoor Air (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/15/2016

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Perchloroethylene in Outdoor Air: Mean Concentration (ug/m3), 2011 NATA

  • Hunterdon
    0.03
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    0.16
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Perchloroethylene (also called tetrachloroethylene), is a colorless liquid widely used for dry cleaning of fabrics. Textile mills, chlorofluorocarbon producers, vapor degreasing and metal cleaning operations, and makers of rubber coatings may also use perchloroethylene. It is also commonly used in aerosol formulations, solvent soaps, printing inks, typewriter correction fluid, adhesives, sealants, shoe polishes and lubricants. Perchloroethylene is a central nervous system depressant. Inhaling its vapors can cause dizziness, headache, sleepiness, confusion, nausea, and unconsciousness. Breathing perchloroethylene over long periods of time can cause liver and kidney damage and memory loss. Perchloroethylene is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a probable human carcinogen.

How Are We Doing?

Several New Jersey counties exceed the health benchmark of 0.17 micrograms of perchloroethylene per cubic meter of air. The highest ambient air concentration can be found in the northeast region (Bergen, Hudson, Somerset, and Essex Counties)

What Is Being Done?

Industrial facilities that emit this chemical must obtain permits from the NJDEP Air Program and are also subject to state and federal air pollution control technology requirements.

Note

Data Source: National-scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), 2011 and NJDEP Division of Air Quality 

Data Sources

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)   Bureau of Air Monitoring, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection  

Measure Description for Perchloroethylene in Outdoor Air

Definition: Mean of modeled annual average perchloroethylene concentration for census tracts in a county using 2011 NATA data
Numerator: Modeled mean perchloroethylene concentration in micrograms per cubic meter
Denominator: N/A

Indicator Profile Report

Perchloroethylene Concentrations in Outdoor Air (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/15/2016

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Fecal Coliform or E. coli in Private Wells: Percent of Wells with Fecal Coliform or E. Coli Detected, Sept 2002 - April 2014

  • Hunterdon
    3.4
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    2.1
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Coliform bacteria are organisms that are present in the environment and in the feces of all warm-blooded animals and humans. Coliform bacteria will not likely cause illness. However, their presence in drinking water indicates that disease-causing organisms (pathogens) could be in the water system. Most pathogens that contaminate water supplies come from the feces of humans or animals. Testing drinking water for all possible pathogens is complex, time-consuming, and expensive. It is relatively easy and inexpensive to test for coliform bacteria.

How Are We Doing?

Between September 2002 and April 2014, fecal coliform or E. coli was detected in 2.1 % of 86,763 private wells in sampled New Jersey. Fecal coliform or E. coli was most commonly detected in Somerset (4.3% of wells), Sussex (4.0% of wells), Passaic (3.7% of wells), Hunterdon (3.4% of wells), Warren (3.4% of wells), Union (3.3% of wells), and Mercer (3.1% of wells) Counties. Online maps showing detection of fecal coliform or E. coli are available at the county level, municipal level, and for 2 mile by 2 mile grids from NJDEP, [http://arcg.is/1CPkHyC]

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Private Well Testing Act (N.J.S.A. 58:12A-26 et seq.) became effective in September 2002. The PWTA requires the buyer or the seller of a property to test untreated well water prior to the sale and review the results prior the closing of title. It also requires landlords to test the private well water supplied to their tenants every five years and provide their tenants with a written copy of the results. The data generated by this program are provided to the homeowners by the laboratory performing the analyses and then sent to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). The NJDEP notifies local health agencies when a well within their jurisdiction is tested under the PWTA. The data from the PWTA are used by NJDEP to assess the quality of the water from private wells throughout the state.

Note

**Results by county are suppressed when the number of tested wells was less than 10. Denominator is the number of tested private wells. Data Source: NJ Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Supply and Geoscience, and Division of Science, Research, and Environmental Health, Private Well Testing Act Data Summary page, [http://arcg.is/1CPkHyC], obtained on July 6, 2016.

Measure Description for Fecal Coliform or E. coli in Private Wells

Definition: Percent of tested private wells with fecal coliform or E. coli detected
Numerator: Number of tested private wells with fecal coliform or E. coli detected
Denominator: Number of tested private wells in a specified period of time

Indicator Profile Report

Fecal Coliform or E. Coli in Private Wells (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/14/2016

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Nitrate in Private Wells: Percent of Wells Exceeding Nitrate MCL, January 2011 through December 2015

  • Hunterdon
    0.7
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    StateNA
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Nitrate is a nitrogen compound that occurs naturally in soil, water, plants, and food. It may be formed when microorganisms in the environment break down organic materials, such as plants, animal manure, and sewage. Nitrate can also be found in chemical fertilizers. Nitrate can get into drinking water from runoff of farms, golf courses and lawns, landfills, animal feedlots, and septic systems. High levels of nitrate in drinking water can lead to methemoglobinemia, a form of anemia, particularly in infants ("blue baby syndrome") and pregnant women.

How Are We Doing?

Between 2011 and 2015, about 2.9% of 36,409 wells tested had concentrations of nitrate above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 milligrams per liter. Two counties had much higher rates of MCL exceedance, Cumberland (16% of wells) and Salem (11.2% of wells).

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Private Well Testing Act (PWTA) became effective in September 2002. The PWTA requires the buyer or the seller of real property to test the well water prior to sale and review the results prior to closing of title. It also requires landlords to test the private well water supplied to their tenants and provide their tenants with a written copy of the results. Test results are provided to homeowners by the laboratory performing the analyses and are also sent to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). The NJDEP notifies the local health agency when a well within its jurisdiction is tested under the PWTA. The data from the PWTA are used by NJDEP to assess the quality of the water from private wells throughout the state. Nitrate is required to be tested for in private wells in all 21 New Jersey counties.

Note

Data Source: Private Well Testing Act Program, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Well Test Results for January 2011 - December 2015. 

Measure Description for Nitrate in Private Wells

Definition: Percent of tested private wells with nitrate concentration exceeding the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 milligrams per liter
Numerator: Number of tested private wells with nitrate concentration exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter in a specified time period
Denominator: Number of tested private wells in a specified time period

Indicator Profile Report

Nitrate in Private Wells (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/16/2016

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Private Well Usage: Self-Reported as Main Source of Drinking Water: Percentage Tested for Contaminants, 2014

  • Hunterdon
    45.2
    95% Confidence Interval (32.5 - 58.0)
    State
    49.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Water is used for many purposes including drinking, cooking, bathing, cleaning, and recreation. Because water use is so common in daily life, there are many opportunities for contaminated water to impact people. New Jersey has over 600 community water systems which provide drinking water to approximately 87% of the State's population. However, about 13 percent of New Jersey residents obtain their drinking water from private wells.

How Are We Doing?

If you are a New Jersey resident who uses their own source of drinking water, like a well, cistern, or spring, you are responsible for protecting and monitoring your water supply. It is essential that you test your water periodically, and maintain your well. There are no federal or state regulations assuring the quality of the water consumed by NJ residents who obtain their drinking water from private wells. The New Jersey Private Well Testing Act (PWTA) assures that the purchasers and lessees of properties served by private potable wells are aware of the quality of their drinking water source prior to the sale or lease of a home or business. Sampling and testing must be conducted by certified laboratories.

Note

Survey question: "Has your well water ever been tested for contaminants in the last 2 years: yes; no; don't know/not sure ?" This question was only asked to individuals who reported that their main water source was a private well. **Data are not shown for Essex, Hudson or Union Counties due to very low usage of private wells in these counties.

Measure Description for Private Well Usage: Self-Reported as Main Source of Drinking Water

Definition: Percent of NJ residents self-reporting using and testing a private well as the main water source for their home.
Numerator: Number of people age 18 years and older self-reporting using and testing a private well as main water source for their home.
Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and older interviewed during the same survey period.

Indicator Profile Report

Self-Reported Testing of Private Well Used for Drinking Water (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

01/26/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Birth Rate: Number of Births per 1,000 Residents, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    7.3
    95% Confidence Interval (6.8 - 7.8)
    State
    11.4
    U.S.
    12.4
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Tracking birth rate patterns among New Jersey and U.S. residents as a whole is critical to understanding population growth and change in this country and in New Jersey.

How Are We Doing?

Birth rates vary widely across the state. Counties with high populations of older persons will have lower birth rates than those with younger, childbearing-age persons. Birth rates also vary by race/ethnicity with Hispanics having nearly double the birth rate of Whites. The rates among Asians/Pacific Islanders and Blacks fall in between.

What Is Being Done?

The Division of Family Health Services in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety, and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Information on programs that promote maternal health before and after pregnancy: [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/prenatal/maternalhealth.shtml http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/prenatal/maternalhealth.shtml]

Note

Confidence limits are not available for national data.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Natality public-use data. CDC WONDER On-line Database accessed at [http://wonder.cdc.gov/natality.html]   National Center for Health Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau. Vintage 2014 bridged-race postcensal population estimates. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/bridged_race.htm as of June 30, 2015.  

Measure Description for Birth Rate

Definition: Number of live births in a given year per 1,000 persons in the population
Numerator: Number of live births
Denominator: Number of persons in population

Indicator Profile Report

Birth Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/24/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Total Fertility Rate: Total Fertility Rate, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    1,545.5
    95% Confidence Interval (1,513.6 - 1,577.4)
    State
    1,747.7
    U.S.
    1,843.5
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

The total fertility rate can be interpreted as a measure of how many children would be born to 1,000 women over their childbearing years, based on birth rates occurring in the present time. As such, it indicates the current capacity for human reproduction in the population. Fertility is the ability to become pregnant and have a baby. Infertility occurs when a couple cannot become pregnant and may be related to a variety of health, behavioral, and/or environmental factors.

How Are We Doing?

New Jersey's total fertility rate is about 1,750 births per 1,000 women. This means that, based on today's birth rates, each woman would give birth to 2 children, on average, over her childbearing years. The total fertility rate varies widely across the state and by race/ethnicity. County rates range from approximately 1,300 to 2,700 births per 1,000 women of childbearing age. The rate among Hispanic women is about 2,050 births per 1,000 women. Rates among White, Black, and Asian/Pacific Islander women lie in the 1,450-1,600 range.

What Is Being Done?

The Division of Family Health Services in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Information on programs that promote maternal health before and after pregnancy: [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/prenatal/maternalhealth.shtml http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/prenatal/maternalhealth.shtml]

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   National Center for Health Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau. Vintage 2015 bridged-race postcensal population estimates. [http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/bridged_race.htm] as of June 28, 2016.  

Measure Description for Total Fertility Rate

Definition: The total fertility rate estimates the number of children a cohort of 1,000 women would bear if they went through their childbearing years experiencing the same age-specific birth rates occurring in a specified time period. It is calculated by summing the age-specific birth rates of women in five year age groups between 15 and 44 years, and then multiplying the sum by five.
Numerator: Sum of age-specific birth rates to resident mothers per 1,000 women
Denominator: Not applicable

Indicator Profile Report

Total Fertility Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/24/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




General Fertility Rate: Number of Live Births per 1,000 Women Age 15-44, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    45.5
    95% Confidence Interval (42.6 - 48.4)
    State
    59.5
    U.S.
    62.6
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

The general fertility rate is a more precise measure than the crude birth rate for tracking birth rate patterns. While the crude birth rate and the general fertility rate both look at the total number of live births among the population, the crude birth rate is calculated using the total population including the young, old, male, and female. The general fertility rate is calculated using only females of reproductive age, defined as ages 15 through 44 years. This results in a more sensitive indicator with which to study population growth and change.

How Are We Doing?

The general fertility rate among New Jersey women is 60 births per 1,000 women of childbearing age. The rate varies widely across the state's counties from a low of 42 to a high of 90. Rates also vary by race/ethnicity. The rate among Hispanics (70) is significantly higher than the rates among other racial/ethnic groups.

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Confidence limits are not available for national data.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   National Center for Health Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau. Vintage 2015 bridged-race postcensal population estimates. [http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/bridged_race.htm] as of June 28, 2016.  

Measure Description for General Fertility Rate

Definition: Number of live births per 1,000 women aged 15-44 years
Numerator: Number of live births
Denominator: Total number of women aged 15-44 years in the population

Indicator Profile Report

General Fertility Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/24/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Age-Specific Birth Rates: Number of Live Births per 1,000 Females Aged 15-17 Years, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    **
    95% Confidence Interval (0.4 - 1.3)
    State
    6.9
    U.S.
    12.5
    ** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Tracking age-specific birth rate patterns shows not only trends in teen births but also trends among older mothers. Teenage pregnancy and childbearing are ongoing public health concerns and the focus of considerable public policy debate. Babies born to teenage mothers are at elevated risk of poor birth outcomes, including higher rates of low birth weight, preterm birth, and infant death. The limited educational, social, and financial resources often available to teenage mothers add to their higher risk profile.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, the highest birth rate is among mothers 30-34 years old. Birth rates among women 30 years old and over increased while birth rates among mothers under 30 years old decreased between 1990 and 2015. For all age groups under 30, Hispanic mothers have the highest birth rate followed by Blacks and then Whites. For those 30 and over, Whites have the highest rates followed by Asians/Pacific Islanders and then Hispanics. Births to teens of all ages and races/ethnicities have been declining for decades and continue to do so. Teen birth rates are highest in the southern counties and in those in the New York metro area.

What Is Being Done?

The Division of Family Health Services in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Information on programs that promote maternal health before and after pregnancy: [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/prenatal/maternalhealth.shtml http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/prenatal/maternalhealth.shtml]

Healthy People Objective FP-8.1:

Reduce the pregnancy rate among adolescent females aged 15 to 17 years
U.S. Target: 36.2 pregnancies per 1,000
State Target: is not comparable because it is for births only, not all pregnancy outcomes

Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics:

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Age-Specific Birth Rates

Definition: The number of resident live births to females in a specific age group per 1,000 females in the age group.
Numerator: The number of resident live births to females in a specific age group
Denominator: The number of females in the age group

Indicator Profile Report

Teen Birth Rates (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/22/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Multiple Births: Percentage of Live Births, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    4.4%
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    4.3%
    U.S.
    3.4%
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

There is a high risk of adverse outcome for multiple births. The outcomes are addressed in the respective indicator profiles.

How Are We Doing?

There were 44% more multiple births in 2015 than in 1990 and the rate of multiple birth increased 78% in that same time period. Both the number and rate of multiple births generally increased through the 1990s and 2000s before beginning to decline after 2011. The vast majority (97%) of multiple births are twins. The number of triplets peaked in 1998 (at 467) and the proportion of multiples that are triplets is now less than one-third of what it was that year (3.1% and 10.1%, respectively).

Evidence-based Practices

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG) Committee on Ethics published an Opinion report in 2013 advising physicians to be knowledgeable about multifetal pregnancy reduction. ACOG suggests prevention as the first approach and then fetal reduction if necessary and acceptable to the patient.[2]

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Multiple Births

Definition: Plurality is the number of all live births and pregnancy losses (miscarriages, ectopic pregnancies, fetal deaths, selective reductions) in a pregnancy. Multiple births are twins, triplets, quadruplets, and higher order births.
Numerator: Number of live births which were part of a multiple pregnancy (twin, triplet, etc.)
Denominator: Total number of live births

Indicator Profile Report

Multiple Births (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/27/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Preterm Births: Percentage of Live Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    8.4%
    95% Confidence Interval (6.7% - 10.4%)
    State
    9.6%
    U.S.
    9.6%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Prematurity increases the risk for infant morbidity and mortality. Infants born preterm are at greater risk of dying in the first month of life. Preterm infants may require intensive care at birth and are at higher risk of developmental disabilities and chronic illnesses throughout life. They are more likely to require special education services. Health care costs and length of hospital stay are higher for preterm infants.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of infants born preterm (before 37 weeks of gestation) among New Jersey residents rose from 7.3% in 1990 to 10.4% in the mid-2000s. In 2015, the rate stood at 9.6%. The rate varies by several maternal and infant characteristics. The rate among Blacks is 55% higher than the rate among Whites.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving birth outcomes.

Healthy People Objective MICH-9.1:

Reduce preterm births
U.S. Target: 11.4 percent

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Preterm Births

Definition: Percent of live born infants born before 37 weeks of gestation based on obstetric estimate Preterm is synonymous with premature. Infants born at or after 37 weeks of pregnancy are called full term. Most pregnancies last around 40 weeks.
Numerator: Number of live born infants born before 37 weeks of gestation to resident mothers
Denominator: Number of live infants born to resident mothers

Indicator Profile Report

Preterm Births (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/06/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




: Percentage of Singleton Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    6.4%
    95% Confidence Interval (4.9% - 8.3%)
    State
    7.6%
    U.S.
    7.8%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for

Definition:
Numerator:
Denominator:

Indicator Profile Report

Preterm Singleton Births (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated





Very Preterm Births: Percentage of Live Births, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    1.2%
    95% Confidence Interval (0.8% - 1.6%)
    State
    1.6%
    U.S.
    1.6%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Prematurity increases the risk for infant morbidity and mortality. Infants born preterm are at greater risk of dying in the first month of life. Preterm infants may require intensive care at birth and are at higher risk of developmental disabilities and chronic illnesses throughout life. They are more likely to require special education services. Health care costs and length of hospital stay are higher for preterm infants. The more preterm an infant is born, the more severe the health problems are likely to be.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of infants born very preterm (before 32 weeks of gestation) among New Jersey residents is 1.6%. The rate varies by several maternal and infant characteristics. The rate among Blacks is two to three times the rates among other racial/ethnic groups. More than 40% of triplets are born very preterm compared to 10% of twins and only 1% of singletons.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving children's health, including reducing infant mortality.

Healthy People Objective MICH-9.4:

Very preterm or live births at less than 32 weeks of gestation
U.S. Target: 1.8 percent

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Very Preterm Births

Definition: Percent of live born infants born before 32 weeks of gestation based on obstetric estimate Preterm is synonymous with premature. Infants born before 37 weeks of pregnancy are considered preterm and those born before 32 weeks of pregnancy are considered very preterm. Infants born after 37 weeks of pregnancy are called full term. Most pregnancies last around 40 weeks.
Numerator: Number of live born infants born before 32 weeks of gestation to resident mothers
Denominator: Number of live born infants born to residents mothers

Indicator Profile Report

Very Preterm Births (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/06/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Very Preterm Singleton Births: Percentage of Singleton Births, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    0.7%
    95% Confidence Interval (0.5% - 1.0%)
    State
    1.2%
    U.S.
    1.2%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Prematurity increases the risk for infant morbidity and mortality. Infants born preterm are at greater risk of dying in the first month of life. Preterm infants may require intensive care at birth and are at higher risk of developmental disabilities and chronic illnesses throughout life. They are more likely to require special education services. Health care costs and length of hospital stay are higher for preterm infants. The more preterm an infant is born, the more severe the health problems are likely to be. There are many health, behavioral, socioeconomic, and environmental factors known to increase the risk of preterm birth. Therefore, it is useful to track preterm birth as part of an Environmental Public Health Tracking system. Infants from multiple births (twins, triplets, etc.), are more likely to be born preterm, so to separate the effect of multiple birth from other causes, the EPHT indicator for very preterm birth focuses on singleton births only.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of singleton infants born very preterm (before 32 weeks of gestation) among New Jersey residents is 1.2%. Preterm delivery of singletons is more than three times as likely among Blacks as it is among Whites and Asians and twice as likely as it is among Hispanics. The rate varies from 0.7% to 1.8% across counties.

What Is Being Done?

The Division of Family Health Services in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving children's health, including reducing infant mortality. [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs]

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Very Preterm Singleton Births

Definition: Percent of live born singleton infants born before 32 weeks of gestation based on obstetric estimate Preterm is synonymous with premature. Infants born before 37 weeks of pregnancy are considered preterm and those born before 32 weeks of pregnancy are considered very preterm. Infants born after 37 weeks of pregnancy are called full term. Most pregnancies last around 40 weeks. Singletons are births that are not twins, triplets, or higher order.
Numerator: Number of live born singleton infants born before 32 weeks of gestation to resident mothers
Denominator: Number of live singleton infants born to residents mothers

Indicator Profile Report

Very Preterm Singleton Births (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/06/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Low Birth Weight: Percentage of Live Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    6.4%
    95% Confidence Interval (5.0% - 8.3%)
    State
    8.1%
    U.S.
    8.1%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Low birth weight (LBW) increases the risk for infant morbidity and mortality. LBW infants are at greater risk of dying in the first month of life. LBW infants may require intensive care at birth and are at higher risk of developmental disabilities and chronic illnesses throughout life. They are more likely to require special education services. Health care costs and length of hospital stay are higher for LBW infants.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, the average birth weight is 3,264 grams or 7 lbs 3 oz. The overall low birth weight rate reached an all time high of 8.4% in 2011. In 2010, for the first time, the New York City Department of Health provided birth weight data for New Jersey residents who delivered in NYC. This additional information is the cause of the sudden increase in low birth weight beginning in 2010. Low birth weight (LBW) rates vary widely across the state and by several maternal and infant characteristics. Black mothers are more likely to deliver LBW infants than are other racial/ethnic groups. LBW rates are lowest among mothers ages 25-29 years. Nearly all triplets are born with LBW, as are more than half of twins. As expected, LBW is negatively correlated with gestational age. Less than 3% of full term infants are of LBW. LBW rates for New Jersey's counties range from 6% to 9%.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving birth outcomes.

Healthy People Objective MICH-8.1:

Low birth weight (LBW)
U.S. Target: 7.8 percent
State Target: 7.7 percent

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Low Birth Weight

Definition: Percent of live-born infants delivered with a birth weight of less than 2,500 grams (about 5 lbs, 8 oz)
Numerator: Number of live-born infants with a birth weight of less than 2,500 grams born to resident mothers
Denominator: Number of live-born infants born to resident mothers

Indicator Profile Report

Low Birth Weight (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/08/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Low Birth Weight Among Singleton Term Births: Percentage of Full Term Singleton Births, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    2.0%
    95% Confidence Interval (1.2% - 3.2%)
    State
    2.2%
    U.S.
    2.4%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Low birth weight (LBW) increases the risk for infant morbidity and mortality. LBW infants are at greater risk of dying in the first month of life. LBW infants may require intensive care at birth and are at higher risk of developmental disabilities and chronic illnesses throughout life. They are more likely to require special education services. Health care costs and length of hospital stay are higher for LBW infants.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, the average birth weight among full term singleton infants is 3,383 grams, or 7 lbs, 7 oz. The percentage of full term singleton infants with low birth weight (LBW) has been steady at 2.2% among New Jersey residents during recent years. The rate varies significantly by factors such as mother's race/ethnicity and age. LBW is most likely among Black, Asian, and teen mothers. Rates vary widely across the state's counties from 1.5% to 2.8%.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving birth outcomes.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Low Birth Weight Among Singleton Term Births

Definition: Percent of live-born singleton infants born at term with a birth weight of less than 2,500 grams (about 5 lbs, 8 oz)
Numerator: Number of live-born singleton infants born at term (37 or more completed weeks of gestation) with a birth weight of less than 2,500 grams born to resident mothers
Denominator: Number of live-born singleton infants born at term to resident mothers

Indicator Profile Report

Low Birth Weight among Singleton Term Births (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/08/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Very Low Birth Weight: Percentage of Live Births, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    1.0%
    95% Confidence Interval (0.7% - 1.5%)
    State
    1.5%
    U.S.
    1.4%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Low birth weight (LBW) increases the risk for infant morbidity and mortality. LBW infants are at greater risk of dying in the first month of life. LBW infants may require intensive care at birth and are at higher risk of developmental disabilities and chronic illnesses throughout life. They are more likely to require special education services. Health care costs and length of hospital stay are higher for LBW infants.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, the average birth weight is 3,264 grams or 7 lbs 3 oz. The very low birth weight rate among New Jersey births has been around 1.5% since the 1990s. Very low birth weight (VLBW) rates vary widely across the state and by several maternal and infant characteristics. The rate among Black mothers is 2-3 times the rate among other racial/ethnic groups. VLBW rates are highest among teen mothers. Two-thirds of triplets are of VLBW while 9% of twins and about 1% of singletons have VLBW. Nearly all infants born before the third trimester of pregnancy (before 28 weeks) are of VLBW while virtually no full term infants are. VLBW rates for New Jersey's counties range from 0.8% to 2.0%.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving children's health, including reducing infant mortality.

Healthy People Objective MICH-8.2:

Very low birth weight (VLBW)
U.S. Target: 1.4 percent
State Target: 1.4 percent

Note

No confidence limits are available for US data.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Very Low Birth Weight

Definition: Percent of live-born infants delivered with a birth weight of less than 1,500 grams (about 3 lbs, 5 oz)
Numerator: Number of live-born infants with a birth weight of less than 1,500 grams born to resident mothers
Denominator: Number of live-born infants born to resident mothers

Indicator Profile Report

Very Low Birth Weight (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/08/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Very Low Birth Weight Among Singleton Births: Percentage of Singleton Births, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    0.7%
    95% Confidence Interval (0.4% - 1.1%)
    State
    1.1%
    U.S.
    1.1%
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Low birth weight (LBW) increases the risk for infant morbidity and mortality. LBW infants are at greater risk of dying in the first month of life. LBW infants may require intensive care at birth and are at higher risk of developmental disabilities and chronic illnesses throughout life. They are more likely to require special education services. Health care costs and length of hospital stay are higher for LBW infants.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, the average birth weight among singletons is 3,303 grams or 7 lbs, 5 oz. The percentage of singleton infants with very low birth weight (VLBW) has remained near 1.1% for at least a decade. The rate among Black mothers is 2-4 times the rate among other racial/ethnic groups. Singleton VLBW rates are lowest among mothers ages 25-34 years. VLBW rates among singletons for New Jersey's counties range from 0.5% to 1.6%.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving children's health, including reducing infant mortality.

Note

Confidence intervals are not available for U.S. data.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Very Low Birth Weight Among Singleton Births

Definition: Percent of live-born singleton infants born with a birth weight of less than 1,500 grams (about 3 lbs, 5 oz)
Numerator: Number of live-born singleton infants with a birth weight of less than 1,500 grams born to resident mothers
Denominator: Number of live-born singleton infants born to resident mothers

Indicator Profile Report

Very Low Birth Weight among Singleton Births (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/08/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Fetal Mortality Rate: Fetal Deaths per 1,000 Live Births Plus Fetal Deaths, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    5.4
    95% Confidence Interval (3.3 - 7.5)
    State
    6.1
    U.S.
    6.1
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

The fetal mortality rate is a critical measure of a population's health and is an important indicator of fetal and maternal health status and medical care.

How Are We Doing?

The fetal mortality rate has been declining for decades and now stands at 6 per 1,000 live births plus fetal deaths. The rate varies widely across the state and by several maternal and infant characteristics. The rate among Blacks is more than twice the rate among other racial/ethnic groups. The rate is highest among older mothers and, regardless of age, unmarried mothers have higher rates than married mothers. Infants whose mothers receive no prenatal care are ten times as likely to be stillborn than those whose mothers receive prenatal care. Lower delivery weight and preterm infants are much more likely to be stillborn, however when the effect of delivery weight is controlled for, singletons are more likely to be stillborn than multiples. The leading causes of fetal death are maternal complications of pregnancy and complications of the placenta, cord, and membranes. These two causes account for 46% of all fetal deaths.

What Is Being Done?

The Division of [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving children's health, including reducing fetal mortality. Information on programs that promote availability and use of prenatal care services may be found at: [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/outcomes/ http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/outcomes/] or [http://njparentlink.nj.gov/njparentlink/health/before/ http://njparentlink.nj.gov/njparentlink/health/before/] The Department of Health has provided state funding to improve perinatal public health services and birth outcomes in communities. Fetal deaths are reviewed by the Fetal Infant Mortality Review Team and recommendations to reduce future deaths are made to public and private sources of care including hospitals, clinics, and health care professionals throughout the state. Efforts are continuing to increase public and provider awareness of needs for greater access to maternal preconception care, more awareness of risky preconception and post-conception behavior and for better general maternal health care.

Healthy People Objective MICH-1.1:

Fetal deaths at 20 or more weeks of gestation
U.S. Target: 5.6 fetal deaths per 1,000 live births and fetal deaths

Note

**Too few fetal deaths to calculate a reliable rate. U.S. data is for 2012 and confidence limits are not available.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Fetal Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registration, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Fetal Mortality Rate

Definition: The number of resident fetal deaths of 20 or more weeks gestation per 1,000 resident live births plus fetal deaths of 20 or more weeks of gestation in the same year.
Numerator: Number of resident fetal deaths of 20 or more weeks gestation in a given year
Denominator: Number of live births plus fetal deaths of 20 or more weeks gestation to resident mothers in the same year

Indicator Profile Report

Fetal Mortality Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

05/04/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Infant Mortality Rate: Deaths per 1,000 Live Births, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    **
    95% Confidence Interval (0.7 - 3.3)
    State
    4.6
    U.S.
    5.9
    ** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

The infant death rate is a critical measure of a population's health and a worldwide indicator of health status and social well-being.

How Are We Doing?

The infant mortality rate in New Jersey has been decreasing since the early 1900s. However, the rate varies widely across the state and by several maternal and infant characteristics. The rate among Blacks is three times the rate among Whites and double the rate among Hispanics. The rate is highest among the oldest and the youngest mothers and, regardless of age, unmarried mothers have rates about double those of married mothers. Infants whose mothers receive no prenatal care are more likely to die than those whose mothers receive prenatal care. Low birth weight and preterm infants are much more likely to die, however when the effect of birth weight is controlled for, singletons are more likely to die than multiple births. Two-thirds of infant deaths occur in the neonatal period (within the first 27 days of life). The leading causes of infant death are congenital anomalies and short gestation/low birth weight. The Healthy New Jersey 2020 targets for the total population and Asians had been met by 2014.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers several programs aimed at improving children's health, including reducing infant mortality. Infant deaths are reviewed by the [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/outcomes/mortality-reviews/ Fetal Infant Mortality Review Team] and recommendations to reduce future deaths are made to public and private sources of care including hospitals, clinics, and health care professionals throughout the state. The Department of Health has provided state funding to improve perinatal public health services and birth outcomes in communities. Efforts are continuing to increase public and provider awareness of needs for greater access to maternal preconception care, more awareness of risky preconception and post-conception behavior, and for better general maternal health care. New Jersey is a participant in the [http://www.nichq.org/project/collaborative-improvement-and-innovation-network-reduce-infant-mortality-im-coiin Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network to Reduce Infant Mortality] (CoIIN-IM). CoIIN is a multiyear national movement engaging federal, state, and local leaders; public and private agencies; professionals; and communities to employ quality improvement, innovation, and collaborative learning to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes.

Healthy People Objective MICH-1.3:

All infant deaths (within 1 year)
U.S. Target: 6.0 infant deaths per 1,000 live births
State Target: 4.8 infant deaths per 1,000 live births

Note

** Number of deaths too small to calculate a reliable rate. Confidence limits are not available for the U.S. data.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Linked Infant Death-Birth Database, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Infant Mortality Rate

Definition: Rate of death occurring under 1 year of age in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year
Numerator: Number of resident deaths occurring under 1 year of age in a given year
Denominator: Number of live births to resident mothers in the same year

Indicator Profile Report

Infant Mortality Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/03/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Neonatal Mortality Rate: Deaths per 1,000 Live Births, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    **
    95% Confidence Interval (0.1 - 2.1)
    State
    3.2
    U.S.
    4.0
    ** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Neonatal mortality is an important indicator of newborn and maternal health status and medical care (pre- and post-delivery).

How Are We Doing?

Two-thirds of infant deaths occur in the neonatal period. The neonatal mortality rate in New Jersey has been decreasing, yet disparities exist across the state and by maternal and infant characteristics. The rate among children of Black mothers is two to three times that of other racial/ethnic groups and most of the counties with high neonatal mortality rates are in South Jersey. The leading causes of neonatal mortality are the same as those among all infants: short gestation (prematurity)/low birth weight and congenital anomalies. These two causes account for 42% of neonatal deaths.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers several programs aimed at improving children's health, including reducing infant mortality. Infant deaths are reviewed by the [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/outcomes/mortality-reviews/ Fetal Infant Mortality Review Team] and recommendations to reduce future deaths are made to public and private sources of care including hospitals, clinics, and health care professionals throughout the state. The Department of Health has provided state funding to improve perinatal public health services and birth outcomes in communities. Efforts are continuing to increase public and provider awareness of needs for greater access to maternal preconception care, more awareness of risky preconception and post-conception behavior, and for better general maternal health care. New Jersey is a participant in the [http://www.nichq.org/project/collaborative-improvement-and-innovation-network-reduce-infant-mortality-im-coiin Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network to Reduce Infant Mortality] (CoIIN-IM). CoIIN is a multiyear national movement engaging federal, state, and local leaders; public and private agencies; professionals; and communities to employ quality improvement, innovation, and collaborative learning to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes.

Healthy People Objective MICH-1.4:

Neonatal deaths (within the first 28 days of life)
U.S. Target: 4.1 neonatal deaths per 1,000 live births

Note

** The number of deaths is too small to calculate a reliable rate. Confidence limits are not available for U.S. data.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Linked Infant Death-Birth Database, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Neonatal Mortality Rate

Definition: Rate of death occurring before 28 days of age in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year Infant mortality is death within the first year of life. It is divided into two components: death before the 28th day of life is neonatal mortality; death between 28 days and one year is postneonatal mortality.
Numerator: Number of resident deaths occurring under 28 days of age in a given year
Denominator: Number of live births to resident mothers in the same year

Indicator Profile Report

Neonatal Mortality Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/04/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Perinatal Mortality Rate: Deaths per 1,000 Live Births Plus Fetal Deaths, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    **
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    5.1
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
    ** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

The perinatal death rate is a critical measure of a population's health. Fetal and neonatal mortality, the components of perinatal mortality, are important indicators of fetal, infant, and maternal health status and medical care (pre- and post-delivery).

How Are We Doing?

The perinatal mortality rate in New Jersey is slowly declining, yet disparities exist across the state and by maternal and infant characteristics. The rate among children of Black mothers is well above that of other race/ethnicity groups. Most of the counties with high perinatal mortality rates are in South Jersey. The leading causes of perinatal mortality are placenta, cord, and membrane complications and short gestation (preterm) and low birth weight.

What Is Being Done?

The Division of Family Health Services in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving children's health, including reducing perinatal mortality. Information on programs that promote availability and use of prenatal care services may be found at: http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/prenatal/index.shtml or http://njparentlink.nj.gov/njparentlink/health/before/ Information on programs that promote newborn health is at: http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/newborn/index.shtml or http://njparentlink.nj.gov/njparentlink/health/safety/ The Department of Health has provided state funding to improve perinatal public health services and birth outcomes in communities. Perinatal deaths are reviewed by the Fetal Infant Mortality Review Team and recommendations to reduce future deaths are made to public and private sources of care including hospitals, clinics, and health care professionals throughout the state. Efforts are continuing to increase public and provider awareness of needs for greater access to maternal preconception care, more awareness of risky preconception and post-conception behavior and for better general maternal health care.

Healthy People Objective MICH-1.2:

Fetal and infant deaths during perinatal period (28 weeks of gestation to 7 days after birth)
U.S. Target: 5.9 perinatal deaths per 1,000 live births and fetal deaths

Note

** The number of deaths is too small to calculate a reliable rate.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Fetal Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registration, New Jersey Department of Health   Linked Infant Death-Birth Database, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Perinatal Mortality Rate

Definition: Rate of fetal deaths at 28 or more weeks of gestation plus infant deaths less than 7 days of age in a given year, per 1,000 live births plus fetal deaths of 28 or more weeks gestation in the same year. [NCHS Definition I] Fetal death, which is also referred to as stillbirth or miscarriage, is defined as death prior to the complete expulsion or extraction of the fetus from its mother, where the fetus shows no signs of life. Additionally, only spontaneous fetal deaths, not induced or intentional terminations of pregnancy, are included in this definition.
Numerator: Number of resident fetal deaths at 28 or more weeks of gestation plus resident infant deaths less than 7 days old in a given year
Denominator: Number of live births plus fetal deaths of 28 or more weeks gestation to resident mothers in the same year

Indicator Profile Report

Perinatal Mortality Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/07/2016

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Postneonatal Mortality Rate: Deaths per 1,000 Live Births, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    **
    95% Confidence Interval (0.0 - 1.8)
    State
    1.4
    U.S.
    1.9
    ** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Postneonatal mortality is an important indicator of infant and maternal health status and medical care (pre and post delivery), as well as a measure of how certain behavioral factors affect infant health.

How Are We Doing?

One-third of infant deaths occur in the postneonatal period. The postneonatal mortality rate among children of Black mothers is three to six times that of other racial/ethnic groups. The leading causes of postneonatal mortality are sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and congenital anomalies (birth defects). These two causes account for 38% of postneonatal deaths.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers several programs aimed at improving children's health, including reducing infant mortality. Infant deaths are reviewed by the [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/maternalchild/outcomes/mortality-reviews/ Fetal Infant Mortality Review Team] and recommendations to reduce future deaths are made to public and private sources of care including hospitals, clinics, and health care professionals throughout the state. The Department of Health has provided state funding to improve perinatal public health services and birth outcomes in communities. Efforts are continuing to increase public and provider awareness of needs for greater access to maternal preconception care, more awareness of risky preconception and post-conception behavior, and for better general maternal health care. New Jersey is a participant in the [http://www.nichq.org/project/collaborative-improvement-and-innovation-network-reduce-infant-mortality-im-coiin Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network to Reduce Infant Mortality] (CoIIN-IM). CoIIN is a multiyear national movement engaging federal, state, and local leaders; public and private agencies; professionals; and communities to employ quality improvement, innovation, and collaborative learning to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes.

Healthy People Objective MICH-1.5:

Postneonatal deaths (between 28 days and 1 year)
U.S. Target: 2.0 postneonatal deaths per 1,000 live births

Note

** The number of deaths is too small to calculate a reliable rate. Confidence limits are not available for U.S. data.

Data Sources

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Linked Infant Death-Birth Database, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Postneonatal Mortality Rate

Definition: Rate of death occurring from 28 days to 364 days of age in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year Infant mortality is death within the first year of life. This is divided into two components: death before the 28th day of life is neonatal mortality; death between 28 days and one year is postneonatal mortality.
Numerator: Number of resident deaths occurring from 28 days to 364 days of age in a given year
Denominator: Number of live births to resident mothers in the same year

Indicator Profile Report

Postneonatal Mortality Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/09/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




General Health Status: Estimated Percent, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    91.3%
    95% Confidence Interval (89.3% - 92.9%)
    State
    83.5%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Self-rated health (SRH) is an independent predictor of important health outcomes including mortality, morbidity, and functional status. It is considered to be a reliable indicator of a person's perceived health and is a good global assessment of a person's well being.

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, 84% of New Jersey adults aged 18 and older reported good, very good or excellent general health status.

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njbrfs/]  

Measure Description for General Health Status

Definition: Percentage of adults in designated subgroup who reported good, very good, or excellent general health
Numerator: Weighted number of survey respondents in designated subgroup who reported good, very good, or excellent general health
Denominator: Weighted total number of survey respondents in designated subgroup except those with missing, "Don't know/Not sure," and "Refused" responses

Indicator Profile Report

Percent of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Reporting Good, Very Good, or Excellent Health Status (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/14/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Obesity Among Adults: Estimated Percent, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    20.4%
    95% Confidence Interval (17.1% - 24.1%)
    State
    26.5%
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Adults who are obese are at increased risk of morbidity from hypertension, high LDL cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, and osteoarthritis.

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Genetic or familial factors may increase the risk for being overweight or obese for some people, but anyone whose calorie intake exceeds the number of calories they burn is at risk. Physical activity and a healthy diet are both important for obtaining and maintaining a healthy weight. Adults who are obese are at increased risk of morbidity from hypertension, elevated LDL cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, respiratory problems, and endometrial, breast, prostate, and colon cancers.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted proportion of obese New Jersey adults increased from 18.5% in 2000 to 25.7% in 2015.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (NPAO) Program within the NJDOH Office of Nutrition and Fitness coordinates efforts to work with communities to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that address behaviors related to increasing physical activity, breastfeeding initiation and duration, and the consumption of fruits and vegetables, and to decreasing the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and high-energy-dense foods, and to decrease television viewing.

Healthy People Objective NWS-9:

Reduce the proportion of adults who are obese
U.S. Target: 30.6 percent (age-adjusted)
State Target: 23.8 percent (age-adjusted)

Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. 

Data Sources

Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Obesity Among Adults

Definition: Percentage of respondents who have a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 calculated from self-reported weight and height. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.
Numerator: Number of respondents who have a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 calculated from self-reported weight and height.
Denominator: Number of adult respondents for whom BMI can be calculated from their self-reported weight and height (excludes unknowns or refusals for weight and height).

Indicator Profile Report

Age-adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 20+ Who are Obese (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/24/2017

For more information:

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity Program, Office of Nutrition and Fitness, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, 50 E State St, Trenton, NJ 08625, Phone: 609-292-2209, Web: http://www.nj.gov/health/nutrition/




Asthma Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits: Rate per 10,000 Residents, 2016

  • Hunterdon
    3.0
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    8.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Asthma is a disease that affects the airways that carry oxygen in and out of the lungs. People with asthma can experience acute episodes where the small airways constrict. These episodes may result in symptoms such as shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, chest pain, and chest tightness. Asthma episodes may be caused by a variety of factors: pollen, pet dander, mold, cockroach allergens, dust mites, tobacco smoke, air pollution, strenuous exercise, weather, and some foods and drugs. Asthma is a chronic disease that cannot be cured, but it can be controlled with an effective medical management plan and avoidance of environmental or occupational triggers.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, over 600,000 adults (9.0%) and 167,000 children (8.7%) are estimated to have asthma currently. The number of women with asthma is almost double the number of men with asthma; however, asthma occurs more frequently in boys than girls. Anyone can develop asthma; however, children, Black, Hispanic, and urban residents are most likely to be affected. Individuals with allergies and people with a family history of asthma are also most likely to suffer from this disease. Hospitalization rates for asthma do not represent the total burden of the illness. Most asthma attacks are successfully managed without hospitalization. Many people with asthma prevent serious asthma attacks through avoidance of triggers and effective medical management. In addition, many people with asthma episodes are treated in emergency departments and are not included in hospitalization statistics. Hospitalization rates measure an infrequent, severe outcome of this disease. Asthma inpatient hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visit rates vary widely among New Jersey counties. Rates for emergency visits are highest in Camden, Cumberland and Essex Counties, and lowest in Hunterdon, Morris, and Somerset Counties. Disparities in inpatient hospitalization and emergency department visit rates likely reflect differences in: access to effective medical management; co-existing chronic diseases; and environmental or occupational asthma triggers. The Healthy New Jersey 2020 (HNJ2020) targets for hospitalizations have been met by Whites, Hispanics, and Asians in all three age groups but not by Blacks. The HNJ2020 targets for ED visits have only been met by Asians ages 5-64. No other racial/ethnic or age groups had yet achieved their target as of 2015.

What Is Being Done?

The NJ Department of Health's Asthma Awareness and Education Program (AAEP), located within the Division of Family Health Services, provides information on asthma for consumers and health professionals, [http://nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/asthma/]. The New Jersey Department of Health's Occupational Health Service has a Work-Related Asthma Program that provides information to workers and employers about prevention of asthma in the workplace: [http://www.state.nj.us/health/eoh/survweb/wra/index.shtml]

Healthy People Objective RD-2:

Reduce hospitalizations for asthma
U.S. Target: a. children under 5 years of age: 18.2, b. persons aged 5 to 64 years: 8.7 (age-adjusted), c. persons aged 65 years and older: 20.1 (age-adjusted)
State Target: a. children under 5 years of age: 32.8, b. persons aged 5 to 64 years: 11.2 (age-specific), c. persons aged 65 years and older: 26.0 (age-specific)

Note

Rates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 population

Data Sources

Office of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/]   U.S. Census Bureau  

Measure Description for Asthma Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits

Definition: Number or rate of hospitalizations or emergency room visits due to asthma in a geographic area in a time period (primary diagnosis of asthma, defined by ICD-9 code 493 for January 2000 through September 2015; and ICD-10 code J45 for the last quarter of 2015 and onward).
Numerator: Number of hospitalizations or emergency room visits due to asthma occurring among residents of a geographic area in a time period.
Denominator: For rates, estimated population of a geographic area in a time period using mid-year population estimates.

Indicator Profile Report

Asthma Hospitalizations (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/20/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): Emergency Department Visits per 10,000 Population, 2016

  • Hunterdon
    15.54
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    25.62
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes obstructed airflow from the lungs. Symptoms include breathing difficulty, cough, mucus (sputum) production and wheezing. COPD is caused by long-term exposure to irritating gases or particulate matter, most often from cigarette smoke. People with COPD are at increased risk of developing heart disease, lung cancer and a variety of other conditions. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis are the two most common conditions that contribute to COPD. Chronic bronchitis is inflammation of the lining of the bronchial tubes, which carry air to and from the air sacs (alveoli) of the lungs. It's characterized by daily cough and mucus (sputum) production. Emphysema is a condition in which the alveoli at the end of the smallest air passages (bronchioles) of the lungs are destroyed as a result of damaging exposure to cigarette smoke and other irritating gases and particulate matter. Chronic lower respiratory disease, primarily COPD, was the third leading cause of death in the United State in 2014. Over fifteen million Americans (6.4%) are believed to have been diagnosed with COPD.

How Are We Doing?

New Jersey's COPD inpatient hospitalization rate remained steady between 2000 and 2010 and began to decrease steadily after 2011. Inpatient hospitalization rates for COPD do not represent the total burden of the illness. Most cases of COPD are managed without hospitalization. Individuals with COPD prevent hospitalization through avoidance of triggers and medical management. In addition, many people with COPD are treated in emergency departments and are not included in inpatient hospitalization statistics. Hospitalization rates measure a severe outcome of this disease. COPD inpatient hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visit rates vary widely among New Jersey counties. Rates for emergency department visits are highest in Atlantic, Camden, Hudson and Warren Counties. Rates for inpatient hospitalizations are highest in Atlantic, Cumberland, Mercer, and Salem Counties. Disparities in inpatient hospitalization and emergency department visit rates likely reflect differences in: smoking; access to effective medical management; co-existing chronic diseases; and environmental or occupational triggers.

Note

Incidence rates per 10,000 population are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (18 age groups: <5, 5-9, ... , 80-84, 85+).

Data Sources

American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau, [https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/]   Office of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/]  

Measure Description for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Definition: Number or rate of hospitalizations or emergency room visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a geographic area in a time period (primary diagnosis of COPD, defined by ICD-9 490-492, 493.2 (only when 490-492 or 496 is present), 496 or ICD-10 codes J40-44).
Numerator: Number of hospitalizations or emergency room visits due to COPD occurring among residents of a geographic area in a time period
Denominator: For rates, estimated population of a geographic area in a time period using mid-year population estimates.

Indicator Profile Report

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/20/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Heart Attack (Acute Myocardial Infarction) Hospitalizations: Rate per 10,000 Residents, 2016

  • Hunterdon
    22.86
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    33.3
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

A heart attack (acute myocardial infarction) occurs because of coronary heart disease, which is the narrowing of the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. When the blood supply to part of the heart is interrupted or blocked, the heart muscle is deprived of oxygen. This can result in chest pain, shortness of breath, nausea, palpitations, sweating and anxiety. Risk factors for coronary heart disease include: high levels of low-density lipoprotein ("bad cholesterol") and triglycerides in the blood; high blood pressure; diabetes; a diet high in saturated fat; physical inactivity; obesity; and excessive alcohol use. Recent research has shown that fine particulate matter air pollution can increase the risk of heart attacks.

How Are We Doing?

According the the CDC, cardiovascular disease, listed as an underlying cause of death, accounts for nearly 801,000 deaths in the US. That's about 1 of every 3 deaths in the US. Nationally, about 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day, an average of 1 death every 40 seconds. The American Heart Association reports the estimated annual incidence of heart attack in the US is 580,000 new attacks and 210,000 recurrent attacks. Average age at the first heart attack is 65.3 years for males and 71.8 years for females. From 2004 to 2014, the annual death rate attributable to coronary heart disease declined 35.5 percent. Progress in reducing heart disease death rates may be attributed to changes in behaviors to reduce risk factors, improved medical management, and advances in medical treatment. Inpatient hospitalization rates for heart attack do not reflect the total burden of illness due to heart disease, since some people die of a coronary event in an emergency department or without being hospitalized. However, since heart attack inpatient hospitalization has been associated with fine particulate matter air pollution, this has been selected as an indicator for Environmental Public Health Tracking. In New Jersey, the age-adjusted hospitalization rate for acute myocardial infarction among adults 35 years and older has been slowly decreasing since 2002.

Note

Rates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 population.

Data Sources

Office of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/]   U.S. Census Bureau  

Measure Description for Heart Attack (Acute Myocardial Infarction) Hospitalizations

Definition: Number or rate of hospitalizations due to acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) in a geographic area in a period of time (primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, defined by ICD-9 codes 410.00-410.92 for January 2000 through September 2015, and ICD-10 codes I21 and I22 for the last quarter of 2015 and beyond)
Numerator: Number of inpatient hospitalizations due to acute myocardial infarction occurring among residents aged 35 and older within a geographic area in a period of time
Denominator: For rates, estimated population of a specified age within a specified geographic area using mid-year population estimates

Indicator Profile Report

Hospitalizations Due to Heart Attack (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/25/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Hospitalization and Emergency Department Visits for Heat Related Illnesses: Annual Age-Adjusted Hospitalization Rates per 100,000, May through September, 2012-2016

  • Hunterdon
    **
    95% Confidence Interval NA
    State
    1.52
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
    ** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

The relationship between extreme heat and increased daily morbidity is well established. This indicator captures inpatient hospital admissions or emergency department visits for heat-related illness or hyperthermia.

How Are We Doing?

Average annual temperatures in New Jersey have increased about 1.2 degrees Fahrenheit (F) between the period of 1971-2000 and the period of 2001-2010. In New Jersey, the total number of days over 90 degrees F has increased by roughly 36 percent since 1949. On average, based on data from 16 weather station locations spread across New Jersey, the number of days over 90 degrees F have increased from about 17 to 23 per year. There are however considerable temperature differences between north and south, coastal and inland, and urban and rural sections of New Jersey. Extreme heat events are predicted to increase in both intensity and duration in future years. Currently, New Jersey generally experiences two heat waves per year with temperatures exceeding 90 F, and the heat waves last about four days. By the 2020s, it is projected that New Jersey will annually experience three to four heat waves lasting four to five days each. Annual number of days over 90 degrees F are projected to rise from an average of 14 days in 2000 to 23-29 days by the 2020s.

What Is Being Done?

The NJ DOH is using data collected from emergency departments and hospitals to identify and track excessive heat related illnesses among New Jersey's residents. NJ DOH will use the information to implement targeted excessive heat event notification and actions that focus surveillance and relief efforts on high risk populations or communities. Appropriate actions include: establishing enhanced real-time syndromic surveillance systems to alert public health officials about increases in heat-related illnesses; enhancing real-time public notification regarding extreme heat events through the web, broadcast media, and social media; and enhancing access to cooling centers.

Related Indicators

Risk Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

** Rates and counts are suppressed if fewer than 10 cases were reported in a specific category.

Data Sources

Office of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/]   U.S. Census Bureau  

Measure Description for Hospitalization and Emergency Department Visits for Heat Related Illnesses

Definition: Count or rate of hospitalization and emergency department visits for heat-related illnesses for a defined population in a specified time interval. Cases were selected using the following ICD-9 codes through September 2015: 992.0 - 992.9, E900.0, or E900.9 as a primary diagnosis, injury cause, or other diagnosis for occurrences during the months of May through September. Cases were excluded if a man-made source of heat (ICD-9 E900.1) was listed. Beginning October 2015, heat-related illness was defined bi ICD-10 codes T67, X30, and X32 (exclusion W92).
Numerator: Count of inpatient hospitalizations or emergency department visits for heat related illnesses among a defined population during the months of May through September.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

Heat-related Illnesses (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/20/2017

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.nj.gov, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Incidence of All Invasive Cancers: Rate per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2013

  • Hunterdon
    427.8
    95% Confidence Interval (394.7 - 463.1)
    State
    483.3
    U.S.
    431.0
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

In New Jersey, approximately 24,300 men and 25,700 women were diagnosed with any type of invasive cancer in 2013. The risk of developing cancer can be reduced with healthy lifestyle choices like avoiding tobacco, limiting alcohol use, protecting your skin from the sun and avoiding indoor tanning, eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, keeping a healthy weight, and being physically active.[1]

How Are We Doing?

Over the years, the age-adjusted incidence rate due to invasive cancer has continued to decline for NJ males but has remained fairly steady for NJ females. In the total NJ population and among each racial/ethnic group, males have higher incidence rates compared to females. The age-adjusted incidence rate due to invasive cancer, which was highest among Black males in New Jersey for the longest time, has been surpassed by White males. For recent years, county incidence rates range from a low of 399 per 100,000 population in Hudson County to a high of 592 per 100,000 population in Salem County.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness, and deaths due to cancer among New Jersey residents, [http://nj.gov/health/ccp/ccc_plan/index.shtml http://nj.gov/health/ccp/ccc_plan/index.shtml].

Data Sources

New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Incidence of All Invasive Cancers

Definition: The age-adjusted rate of invasive cancer per 100,000 population. ICD-O codes: C00-C97
Numerator: Number of persons with invasive cancer
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Invasive Cancer Incidence Rates (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

03/24/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Bladder Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    46.6
    95% Confidence Interval (39.3 - 54.9)
    State
    41.5
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, nearly 1,800 men and 585 women in New Jersey were diagnosed with cancer of the urinary bladder. Bladder cancer is more common among men than women, and is more common among whites than blacks. Bladder cancer occurs more frequently as people age. Smoking is an established risk factor for bladder cancer, with smokers being diagnosed with bladder cancer twice as often as non-smokers.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted incidence rate of bladder cancer in New Jersey men averaged about 45 cases per 100,000 over the interval. Among New Jersey women, age-adjusted bladder cancer incidence averaged about 12 cases per 100,000 over the interval. The lifetime risk of developing bladder cancer is 1 in 26 for men and 1 in 89 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Bladder Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive and in situ urinary bladder cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of invasive and in situ urinary bladder cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Urinary Bladder Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Brain and Other Nervous System Cancers: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    9.3
    95% Confidence Interval (6.0 - 13.7)
    State
    8.5
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

In New Jersey, 387 males and 291 females were diagnosed with brain and other nervous system (ONS) cancers during 2014. While a variety of risk factors have been found for brain and ONS cancers, the cause of most of these tumors is not fully understood.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the average age-adjusted incidence rate of brain and ONS cancer in New Jersey was 8.7 cases per 100,000 in males and 6.1 per 100,00 in females. The lifetime risk of developing brain and other nervous system cancer is 1 in 144 for men and 1 in 184 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics:


Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Brain and Other Nervous System Cancers

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive brain and other nervous system cancers for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of brain and other nervous system cancers among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Brain and ONS Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Childhood Brain and Central Nervous System Cancers: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000, 1990-2014

  • Hunterdon
    3.2
    95% Confidence Interval (1.9 - 4.9)
    State
    3.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

In general, childhood cancers are rare and represent about 1% of all cancers. Cancers of the brain and central nervous sytem (CNS) are the second most common type of childhood cancers (ages 0 - 14), and represent over 20% of all cancers in this age group. At this time, we do not know what causes most childhood brain and CNS cancers.

How Are We Doing?

On average, 78 children ages 0-19 are diagnosed annually with brain and CNS cancers in New Jersey. Between 1990 and 2014, the New Jersey brain and central nervous system cancers incidence rates in children ages 0 - 14 and 0 - 19 were generally stable. Mortality rates for most types of childhood cancers have steadily decreased in recent years due to improved treatments.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases over the defined interval.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Childhood Brain and Central Nervous System Cancers

Definition: Incidence rate of brain and central nervous system cancers in children for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of brain and other nervous system cancers in children among a defined population in a specified time interval. Cases were selected using ICCC recode ICD-0-3/WHO recode.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval. Population age groups 0-14 and 0-19 are both found to be useful by the International Classification of Childhood Cancers (ICCC).

Indicator Profile Report

Incidence of Childhood Brain and Central Nervous System Cancers (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/07/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Childhood Leukemia: Age-Adjusted rate per 100,000, 1990-2014

  • Hunterdon
    5.7
    95% Confidence Interval (4.0 - 8.0)
    State
    5.2
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

In general, childhood cancers are rare and represent about 1% of all cancers. Leukemias are the most common childhood cancers, accounting for about 30 percent of all cancers in children age 0 - 14 years. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) accounts for about 75 percent of childhood leukemias. At this time, we do not know what causes most leukemias.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, New Jersey childhood leukemia incidence rates (ages 0 - 14, and 0 - 19), were generally stable. On average, 115 children ages 0-19 are diagnosed annually with leukemia in New Jersey. Mortality rates for most types of childhood cancers have steadily decreased in recent years due to improved treatments.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases over the defined interval.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Childhood Leukemia

Definition: Incidence rate of leukemia in children for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of leukemia in children among a defined population in a specified time interval. Cases were selected using ICCC recode ICD-0-3/WHO recode.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval. Population age groups 0-14 and 0-19 are both found to be useful by the International Classification of Childhood Cancers (ICCC).

Indicator Profile Report

Incidence of Childhood Leukemia in New Jersey (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/07/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Breast Cancer in Females: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    152.5
    95% Confidence Interval (140.5 - 165.4)
    State
    132.0
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

In New Jersey, 7,488 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States, other than skin cancer. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in American women, after lung cancer.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the average age-adjusted breast cancer rate in females was 135.1 per 100,000. During the same time period, the age-adjusted breast cancer rate for women age 50 and older decreased from 397.6 cases to 356.5 cases per 100,000. The lifetime risk of developing breast cancer is 1 in 8 for women and 1 in 806 for men.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Related Indicators

Health Care System Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Breast Cancer in Females

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive breast cancer in females for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of breast cancer in females among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Breast Cancer Incidence in Females (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Esophageal Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    8.6
    95% Confidence Interval (5.7 - 12.6)
    State
    7.8
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 344 male and 125 female New Jersey residents were diagnosed with cancer of the esophagus.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted esophageal cancer rate in males averaged 8.6 cases per 100,000. In females, the average rate was 2.3 cases per 100,000. The lifetime risk of developing esophageal cancer is 1 in 185 for men and 1 in 455 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Esophageal Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive esophagus cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of esphageal cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Esophageal Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Kidney and Renal Pelvis Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    17.2
    95% Confidence Interval (13.2 - 22.1)
    State
    21.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 1,046 male and 624 female New Jersey residents were diagnosed with kidney and renal pelvis cancer. Cancer of the kidney and renal pelvis is more common among people over 50, and occurs more often among men than women. The risk of kidney cancer among smokers is about 40% higher than among nonsmokers.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted kidney and renal pelvis cancer rate in males increased from about 15 cases to 22 cases per 100,000. In females the increase was from about 8 cases to 11 cases per 100,000. The reasons for the increase are not clear, though increased use of diagnostic imaging techniques may allow the finding of more kidney cancers. The lifetime risk of developing kidney and renal pelvis cancer is 1 in 48 for men and 1 in 83 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Kidney and Renal Pelvis Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive kidney and renal pelvis cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of kidney and renal pelvis cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Kidney and Renal Pelvis Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Laryngeal Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    4.7
    95% Confidence Interval (2.7 - 7.7)
    State
    5.7
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 262 male and 70 female New Jersey residents were diagnosed with cancer of the larynx (voice box). Factors that can increase your risk of laryngeal cancer include: tobacco use, including smoking and chewing tobacco; heavy alcohol consumption; and possibly a virus called the human papillomavirus (HPV).

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted rate of laryngeal cancer in males decreased from 9.6 to 5.4 cases per 100,000. In females, the rate decreased from 2.2 to 1.2 per 100,000 during the same interval. The lifetime risk of developing laryngeal cancer is 1 in 175 for men and 1 in 806 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Laryngeal Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive laryngeal cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of laryngeal cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Laryngeal Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Leukemia: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    16.6
    95% Confidence Interval (12.5 - 21.8)
    State
    19.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 859 New Jersey males and 699 females of all ages were diagnosed with leukemias. At this time, we do not know what causes most leukemias.

How Are We Doing?

The four most common types of leukemias occur with differing frequencies in adults versus children. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of childhood leukemia and also affects adults, especially those age 65 and older. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) occurs in both adults and children. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia most commonly affects adults over age 55, and rarely occurs in children. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) occurs mainly in adults. Leukemia incidence rates and counts by age group are provided for the four most common types of leukemia. Detailed incidence rates and counts by gender and county are provided for the two most common types of leukemia (AML and CLL). Although it is often thought of as a children's disease, most cases of leukemia occur in older adults. Leukemia is ten times more common in adults than in children, and more than half of all leukemia cases occur in people over the age of 65. The lifetime risk of developing leukemia is 1 in 57 for men and 1 in 81 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Leukemia

Definition: Incidence rate of leukemia by sub-type for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of leukemia by sub-type among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Leukemia Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/22/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Liver Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    9.2
    95% Confidence Interval (6.2 - 13.2)
    State
    11.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 525 male and 172 female New Jersey residents were diagnosed with liver cancer. Cancer of the liver is more common in older people, and is more common in men than in women. Liver cancer rates are highest among Asians and Pacific Islanders, most likely because of higher prevalence of viral hepatitis infection.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted liver cancer rate in males increased from 4.6 to 10.4 cases per 100,000. Among New Jersey females, the age-adjusted rate increased from 1.6 to 2.9 cases per 100,000 during the same interval. The lifetime risk of developing liver and bile duct cancer is 1 in 74 for men and 1 in 176 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Liver Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive liver cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of liver cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Liver Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Lung & Bronchus Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    56.8
    95% Confidence Interval (48.7 - 65.9)
    State
    65.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

In New Jersey 2,774 men and 3,053 women were diagnosed with cancer of the lung or bronchus during 2014. Lung cancer causes the most cancer deaths among New Jersey residents - over 1,940 among men and 2,000 among women in 2014. Cigarette smoking is believed to be responsible for almost 90% of all lung cancer cases. Other risk factors include second-hand smoke, residential radon exposure, high doses of ionizing radiation such as might be received from therapeutic radiation treatment, and certain occupational exposures. Air pollution, specifically particulates from burning fossil fuel, is also a risk factor for lung cancer.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted incidence rate of lung and bronchus cancer in New Jersey men declined from about 107 cases per 100,000 to about 60 cases per 100,000. Among NJ woman in the lung and bronchus age-adjusted cancer incidence rate increased and then decreased slightly averaging 54.4 cases per 100,000 for the same time period, 1990-2014. Past smoking patterns among men and women are the main cause for these trends. The percentage of women who smoke began decreasing rapidly in the mid-1980's, while the percentage of men who smoke began decreasing rapidly much earlier (before 1965). The lifetime risk of developing lung and bronchus cancer is 1 in 14 for men and 1 in 17 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Lung & Bronchus Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive lung and bronchus cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of lung and bronchus cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Melanoma of the Skin: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    44.2
    95% Confidence Interval (37.2 - 52.2)
    State
    28.7
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Cancer of the skin is by far the most common of all cancers. Melanoma accounts for less than 5% of skin cancer cases but causes a large majority of skin cancer deaths. Most melanoma of the skin is caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Whites have age-adjusted incidence rates that are more than 20 times higher than Blacks. People with light complexions have the highest risk of melanoma of the skin.

How Are We Doing?

During 2014, 1,360 men and 926 women in New Jersey were diagnosed with melanoma of the skin. Between 1990 and 2014, age-adjusted incidence rates for melanoma of the skin increased from 14.4 to 29.2 cases per 100,000 for males and from 10.2 cases to 16.8 cases per 100,000 in females. During the same interval, age-adjusted incidence rates increased in Whites from 13.1 to 25.5 per 100,000. The lifetime risk of developing melanoma of the skin is 1 in 38 for men and 1 in 61 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Melanoma of the Skin

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive melanoma of the skin for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of melanoma of the skin among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Melanoma of the Skin Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Mesothelioma: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    2.0
    95% Confidence Interval (0.7 - 4.5)
    State
    2.2
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 80 male and 27 female New Jersey residents were diagnosed with mesothelioma. The main risk factor for developing mesothelioma is exposure to asbestos.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the average age-adjusted mesothelioma rate in males was 2.9 per 100,000. In females, the average age-adjusted mesothelioma rate was 0.6 per 100,000.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. **Rates/counts are suppressed if fewer than 5 cases were reported in the specified category. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Mesothelioma

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive mesothelioma for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of mesothelioma among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Mesothelioma Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/21/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    27.2
    95% Confidence Interval (21.7 - 33.7)
    State
    25.5
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

In New Jersey, 1,161 males and 1019 females were diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma during 2014.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted incidence rate of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in New Jersey males increased from about 22 cases per 100,000 to about 25 cases per 100,000. Among New Jersey females, the incidence rates increased from about 15 cases per 100,000 in 1990 to about 18 cases per 100,000 in 2014. The lifetime risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma is 1 in 42 for men and 1 in 54 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Definition: Incidence rate of non-Hodgkin lymphoma for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/22/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Oral Cavity and Pharynx Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    13.2
    95% Confidence Interval (9.9 - 17.5)
    State
    15.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 801 male and 327 female New Jersey residents were diagnosed with cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. The most common sites for oral cavity and pharynx cancers are the tongue, floor of the mouth, gums, lip, tonsil, or lower pharynx. The most common risk factors for getting cancer of the oral cavity are tobacco use (both cigarette smoking and smokeless/chewing tobacco) and drinking alcoholic beverages in excess.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted oral cavity and pharynx cancer rate in males averaged 15.6 cases per 100,000 population. In females, the age-adjusted oral cavity and pharynx cancer rate averaged 6.3 cases per 100,000 population. The lifetime risk of developing oral cavity and pharynx cancer is 1 in 63 for men and 1 in 148 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Oral Cavity and Pharynx Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive oral cavity and pharynx cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of oral cavity and pharynx cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Oral Cavity and Pharynx Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/22/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Pancreatic Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    18.9
    95% Confidence Interval (14.3 - 24.4)
    State
    15.6
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 719 male and 768 female New Jersey residents were diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted pancreatic cancer rate averaged 14.6 cases in males and 11.5 cases per 100,000 among females. The lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer is 1 in 64 for men and 1 in 66 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Pancreatic Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive cancer of the pancreas for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of cancer of the pancreas among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Pancreas Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/22/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Prostate Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Males, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    105.7
    95% Confidence Interval (95.2 - 117.1)
    State
    139.4
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, over 5,750 men in New Jersey were diagnosed with cancer of the prostate. Prostate cancer is the 2nd most frequently diagnosed cancer among men in NJ and the US. Prostate cancer occurs more frequently as men age, with most cases occurring after age 50.

How Are We Doing?

Prostate cancer incidence rates have decreased overall after 1992. This trend is thought to be due to changes in prostate cancer screening practices. The lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer is 1 in 8 for men

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Related Indicators

Risk Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Prostate Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive prostate cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of prostate cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Prostate Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/19/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Incidence of Thyroid Cancer: Age-Adjusted Rate per 100,000 Females, 2010-2014

  • Hunterdon
    22.3
    95% Confidence Interval (17.3 - 28.4)
    State
    27.9
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

During 2014, 464 male and 1,358 female New Jersey residents were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer is different than many adult cancers in that it occurs about 3 times more often in women than in men, and it is more frequently diagnosed in younger adults.

How Are We Doing?

Between 1990 and 2014, the age-adjusted thyroid cancer rate in females rose from about 7 cases per 100,000 to about 28 cases per 100,000. In males, the increase was smaller, from about 3 per 100,000 to about 10 per 100,000 in 2014. The reason for the sharp increase in thyroid cancer incidence rates, especially in recent years, is unknown. Theorized explanations include increased diagnosis of thyroid cancer by medical practitioners and increased prevalence of possible risk factors such as diagnostic radiation and obesity. The lifetime risk of developing thyroid cancer is 1 in 163 for men and 1 in 57 for women.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/ccc_plans.htm]

Note

Incidence rates (cases per 100,000 population per year) are age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population (19 age groups: <1, 1-4, 5-9, ..., 80-84, 85+). Rates are for invasive cancer only (except for bladder cancer which is invasive and in situ) or unless otherwise specified. Number of cases (numerator) is the total count of cases in five years.

Data Sources

NJ State Cancer Registry, March 29, 2017 Analytic File, using NCI SEER*Stat ver 8.3.4, [https://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/]   NJ population estimates as calculated by the NCI's SEER Program, released December 2016, [http://www.seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html]  

Measure Description for Incidence of Thyroid Cancer

Definition: Incidence rate of invasive thyroid cancer for a defined population in a specified time interval. Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Standard Population. Rates are per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of new cases of thyroid cancer among a defined population in a specified time interval.
Denominator: Defined population in a specified time interval.

Indicator Profile Report

NJ Age-Adjusted Invasive Thyroid Cancer Incidence (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/22/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Average Age at Death: Average age at death (years), 2015

  • Hunterdon
    76.2
    95% Confidence Interval (75.1 - 77.2)
    State
    75.2
    U.S.NA
    NA=Data not available.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Average age at death can be used as an easier-to-calculate proxy for life expectancy.

How Are We Doing?

Average age at death among New Jersey residents is slowly increasing, up 2% between 2000 and 2015. Average age at death is highest among Whites, followed, in order, by Asians, Blacks, and Hispanics. (Note that this may be due, in part, to the underlying age composition of each racial/ethnic group.) The average age at death among females is 7 years higher than among males. Among all causes of death, Alzheimer's disease has the highest average age (87.8 years). Unintentional injury has the lowest average age (54.0) among the ten leading causes of death. Deaths due to non-chronic conditions generally have much lower average ages at death than deaths due to chronic conditions.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health  

Measure Description for Average Age at Death

Definition: The arithmetic mean age, in years, at which a group of persons died
Numerator: The sum of ages at death among decedents in a given time period
Denominator: Total number of decedents in that time period

Indicator Profile Report

Average Age at Death (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

09/28/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Age-Adjusted Death Rate: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    558.7
    95% Confidence Interval (517.5 - 600.0)
    State
    666.3
    U.S.
    733.1
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Age-adjusted death rates are constructs that show what the level of mortality would be if no changes occurred in the age composition of the population from year to year. Age-adjusted death rates are better than crude death rates as indicators of relative risk when comparing mortality across geographic areas or between gender or racial/ethnic subgroups of the population that have different age compositions.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate is decreasing fairly steadily. The age-adjusted death rate among Blacks is 1.2 times the rate among Whites, 1.8 times the rate among Hispanics, and 2.9 times the rate among Asians. The age-adjusted death rate among males is about 40% higher than the rate among females. Rates vary across New Jersey counties from a low of 558 in Bergen County to a high of 907 in Cumberland County.

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Age-Adjusted Death Rate

Definition: The number of resident deaths per 100,000 population age-adjusted to the US 2000 standard population
Numerator: The number of resident deaths
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/06/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Alzheimer's Disease: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    7.1
    95% Confidence Interval (4.4 - 9.8)
    State
    17.8
    U.S.
    29.4
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death among U.S. and New Jersey residents. In New Jersey, it was the seventh leading cause of death from 2007 to 2014, eighth from 2004 to 2006, and tenth from 1998 to 2003. Prior to that it was not in the top ten.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate due to Alzheimer's disease continues to rise. In New Jersey, more than 2,000 deaths each year are due to Alzheimer's disease. In the total population and among each racial/ethnic group, females have higher death rates than males. Alzheimer's disease is the fifth leading cause of death among women and ninth among men in New Jersey. The age-adjusted death rate due to Alzheimer's disease is highest among Whites in New Jersey. Alzheimer's disease is the third leading cause of death among persons aged 85 years and over. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 7 in Hunterdon to a high of 29 in Sussex.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Human Services' [Alzheimer's Adult Day Services Program http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/doas/home/alzheimer.html] partially subsidizes the purchase of adult day care services for persons with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia.

Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics:


Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Alzheimer's Disease

Definition: Deaths with Alzheimer's disease as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 code: G30
Numerator: Number of deaths due to Alzheimer's disease
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Alzheimer's Disease (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/10/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Cancer: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    129.8
    95% Confidence Interval (109.9 - 149.7)
    State
    150.8
    U.S.
    158.5
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S. and New Jersey. It is the leading cause of death among persons 45-79 years of age as well as the leading cause of death among Hispanics and Asians in New Jersey. It is the second leading cause of death among Whites and Blacks.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate due to cancer has been slowly declining for several years. In New Jersey, over 16,000 deaths each year are due to cancer. In the total population and among each racial/ethnic group, males have higher death rates than females. The age-adjusted death rate due to cancer is highest among Blacks in New Jersey but the gap is narrowing. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 130 in Hunterdon to a high of 194 in Cumberland.

What Is Being Done?

A Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan was developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness, and deaths due to cancer among New Jersey residents, [http://nj.gov/health/ces/public/resources/occp.shtml http://nj.gov/health/ces/public/resources/occp.shtml].

Healthy People Objective C-1:

Reduce the overall cancer death rate
U.S. Target: 161.4 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)
State Target: 161.5 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Cancer

Definition: Deaths with malignant neoplasm (cancer) as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: C00-C97
Numerator: Number of deaths due to all types of cancer
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to All Cancers (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/07/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Colorectal Cancer: Deaths per 100,000 Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    11.8
    95% Confidence Interval (8.4 - 15.3)
    State
    14.5
    U.S.
    14.4
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among men and third among women in New Jersey.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate due to colorectal cancer is decreasing and, by 2014, the Healthy New Jersey targets for Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, and the total population had been met. The rate is highest among Blacks, followed in order by Whites, Hispanics, and Asians.

Evidence-based Practices

Screening can find precancerous polyps (abnormal growths in the colon or rectum) so they can be removed before turning into cancer. Screening also helps find colorectal cancer at an early stage, when treatment often leads to a cure. [https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/ ^1^]

Healthy People Objective C-5:

Reduce the colorectal cancer death rate
U.S. Target: 14.5 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)
State Target: 15.8 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)

Related Indicators

Health Care System Factors:

Risk Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Colorectal Cancer

Definition: Deaths with malignant neoplasm (cancer) of the colon, rectum, and anus as the underlying cause of death ICD-10 codes: C18-C21
Numerator: Number of deaths due to cancer of the colon, rectum, and anus
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Colorectal Cancer (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/14/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Deaths due to Breast Cancer: Deaths per 100,000 Female Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    22.5
    95% Confidence Interval (15.8 - 29.2)
    State
    22.0
    U.S.
    20.6
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of deaths due to cancer among women in New Jersey, claiming about 1,300 lives annually.

How Are We Doing?

Deaths due to breast cancer are on a slow decline with the age-adjusted rate nearing 20 per 100,000 females. The rate is highest among Blacks, followed in order by Whites, Hispanics, and Asians. The Healthy NJ 2020 target was met in 2012 among the total population and Whites. Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians are expected to meet their targets by 2020.

Evidence-based Practices

Getting mammograms regularly can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that average-risk women who are 50 to 74 years old should have a screening mammogram every two years.[https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/ ^1^]

Healthy People Objective C-3:

Reduce the female breast cancer death rate
U.S. Target: 20.7 deaths per 100,000 females (age-adjusted)
State Target: 23.5 deaths per 100,000 females (age-adjusted)

Related Indicators

Health Care System Factors:

Risk Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Breast Cancer

Definition: Deaths with malignant neoplasm (cancer) of the female breast as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 code: C50
Numerator: Number of deaths among females due to breast cancer
Denominator: Total number of females in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Female Breast Cancer (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/14/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




: Deaths per 100,000 Population, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    28.2
    95% Confidence Interval (18.9 - 37.5)
    State
    34.9
    U.S.
    40.5
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for

Definition:
Numerator:
Denominator:

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Lung Cancer (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated





Deaths due to Prostate Cancer: Deaths per 100,000 Male Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    22.5
    95% Confidence Interval (15.7 - 29.3)
    State
    18.0
    U.S.
    19.0
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men[http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/prostate/ ^1^] and, in New Jersey, is the third leading cause of death due to cancer among men.

How Are We Doing?

The death rate due to prostate cancer among all New Jersey males is trending downward and each Healthy New Jersey 2020 target has been met. The rate among Blacks has nearly halved since 2000 but remains more than double the rates among Whites and Hispanics.

Healthy People Objective C-7:

Reduce the prostate cancer death rate
U.S. Target: 21.8 deaths per 100,000 males (age-adjusted)
State Target: 21.2 deaths per 100,000 males (age-adjusted)

Related Indicators

Health Care System Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Prostate Cancer

Definition: Deaths with malignant neoplasm (cancer) of the prostate as the underlying cause of death ICD-10 code: C61
Numerator: Number of deaths among males due to cancer of the prostate
Denominator: Total number of males in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-adjusted Death Rate due to Prostate Cancer (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/14/2017

For more information:

Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-633-0500, Fax: 609-633-7509, e-mail: cancer@doh.nj.gov, web: www.nj.gov/health/ces




Deaths due to Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    22.6
    95% Confidence Interval (14.3 - 30.9)
    State
    29.6
    U.S.
    41.6
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD) is the third leading cause of death in the US and fifth in New Jersey.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, over 3,000 deaths each year are due to chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD). In the total population and among each racial/ethnic group, males have a higher death rate than females. Among females, the rate is highest among Whites, but among males, the rate is nearly identical for both Whites and Blacks. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 20 in Bergen to a high of 51 in Salem and Sussex. In 2015, CLRD dropped to fifth leading cause of death among New Jersey residents after many years of being the fourth leading cause of death. The main reason for the switch is that deaths due to unintentional injuries (specifically, drug poisonings) have risen above CLRD deaths, not because CLRD deaths are decreasing.

What Is Being Done?

The [Pediatric/Adult Asthma Coalition of New Jersey http://pacnj.org/] (PACNJ) was founded in 2000 to act as a statewide clearinghouse for pediatric asthma programs and services. NJDOH has partnered with other departments within the state to create an Interdepartmental Asthma Plan to serve as a coordinated statewide planning guide.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases

Definition: Deaths with chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD) as the underlying cause of death. CLRD includes emphysema, asthma, bronchitis, and other chronic lower respiratory diseases. ICD-10 codes: J40-J47
Numerator: Number of deaths due to chronic lower respiratory diseases
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/10/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Diabetes: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2014-2015

  • Hunterdon
    14.0
    95% Confidence Interval (9.4 - 18.7)
    State
    18.6
    U.S.
    21.1
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Diabetes is the eighth leading cause of death among all New Jersey residents. It is the fifth leading cause among Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians and sixth among males.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, about 2,000 deaths each year are due to diabetes. The age-adjusted death rate has substantially declined in recent years and currently stands at 17.9. The rate among Blacks is much higher than that of other racial/ethnic groups but the gap is narrowing. The rate among males is higher than the rate among females for each racial/ethnic group. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 13 in Morris to a high of 33 in Cumberland.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/diabetes/ Diabetes Prevention and Control Program] facilitates grant funding for Diabetes Resource Coordination Centers (DRCCs) to improve prevention and control of diabetes.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Diabetes

Definition: Deaths with diabetes as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: E10-E14
Numerator: Number of deaths due to diabetes
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Diabetes (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/12/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Heart Disease: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    146.7
    95% Confidence Interval (125.5 - 167.9)
    State
    166.8
    U.S.
    168.5
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Heart disease affects every segment of the population. It is the leading cause of death among all Americans, all New Jerseyans, men, and women. It is also the leading cause of death among Whites and Blacks and the second leading cause of death among Hispanics and Asians.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate due to heart disease has been steadily declining for many years. In New Jersey, over 18,000 deaths each year are due to heart disease. In the total population and among each racial/ethnic group, males have a higher death rate than females. The age-adjusted death rate due to heart disease is highest among Black males in New Jersey, but the rate among White males is only slightly lower. County rates range from a low of 136 deaths per 100,000 residents (age-adjusted) in Somerset to a high of 223 in Salem.

What Is Being Done?

The NJDOH [http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/chronic/heart-disease-stroke/ Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention] (NJHDSP) Program works in partnership with public and private sector groups and organizations from health care, work site, and community settings to affect policy and systems level change. The NJHDSP Program strives to address all points of opportunity, from prevention of heart disease and stroke in healthy persons to controlling risk factors, treatment of illness and prevention of recurrence in those who have had an event, as well as issues related to rehabilitation, long-term, and end-of-life care. The Office of [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/cardiac-stroke-services/ Health Care Quality Assessment] collects and publishes data on all patients who undergo cardiac catherization and open heart surgery in New Jersey.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Heart Disease

Definition: Deaths with heart disease as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: I00-I09,I11,I13,I20-I51
Numerator: Number of deaths due to heart disease
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Heart Disease (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/07/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Coronary Heart Disease: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    101.8
    95% Confidence Interval (84.2 - 119.5)
    State
    104.8
    U.S.
    108.3
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Heart disease is the leading cause of death of men and women in the United States and in New Jersey. Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease and can cause heart attack, angina, heart failure, and arrhythmias.

How Are We Doing?

Age-adjusted death rates due to coronary heart disease have been declining for several decades and, by 2014, the Healthy New Jersey 2020 targets for the total population, Whites, Blacks, and Asians had been met. Gaps by race/ethnicity and by sex persist, with the rate among males 1.8 times that of females. Rates vary across the state from a low of 82 per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) in Somerset County to a high of 150 in Salem County.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/heart-disease-stroke/ Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program] (NJHDSPP) produces models for improving the prevention and management of heart disease and stroke in New Jersey. NJHDSPP uses these models to assist New Jersey-based healthcare organizations in meeting nationally-recognized best practices and standards for the prevention and treatment of heart disease and stroke. NJHDSPP administers federal funding to private and public sector recipients to affect policy and systems level change and seeks partnerships to perform facility and process assessments.

Healthy People Objective HDS-2:

Reduce coronary heart disease deaths
U.S. Target: 103.4 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)
State Target: Not comparable. Healthy People 2020 objective does not include hypertensive heart disease (ICD-10 code I11).

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Coronary Heart Disease

Definition: Deaths with coronary heart disease as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: I11 (hypertensive heart disease), I20-I25 (ischemic heart disease)
Numerator: Number of deaths due to coronary heart disease
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Coronary Heart Disease (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/13/2017

For more information:

Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program, Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Services, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ 08625, Phone: 609-292-8540, Web: http://nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/stroke.shtml




Deaths due to HIV Disease: Deaths per 100,000 Population, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    **
    95% Confidence Interval (0.0 - 1.1)
    State
    2.9
    U.S.
    2.1
    ** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

HIV is a virus that weakens a person's immune system by destroying cells that fight disease and infection. No cure exists for HIV but with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled.[https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/index.html ^1^]

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate due to HIV disease has been steadily declining. The Healthy New Jersey 2020 targets were achieved in 2009 by the total population and Whites and in 2010 by Blacks and Hispanics. However, the rate among Blacks remains significantly above the rate among other racial/ethnic groups. The rate among males is above that of females, but the gap continues to narrow.

What Is Being Done?

New Jersey has initiated an HIV Pre Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) initiative that places PrEP Counselors in 24 locations across the state. Free, confidential rapid HIV testing is offered at 140 rapid HIV testing sites throughout NJ. The HIV Prevention Patient Navigator Program located in 15 HIV clinics is a linkage to care initiative that can help persons who test positive or are not in HIV care obtain an appointment for care and treatment on the same or next business day. There are also 44 community-based projects providing HIV prevention services to high risk populations located in areas that have been heavily impacted by the HIV epidemic. Several state-wide initiatives also provide intensive, specialized HIV prevention and risk reduction services including drop-in centers, syringe access programs, and church based prevention initiatives.

Healthy People Objective HIV-12:

Reduce deaths from HIV infection
U.S. Target: 3.3 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)
State Target: 4.2 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)

Note

** Number of deaths too small to calculate a reliable rate.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Deaths due to HIV Disease

Definition: Deaths with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: B20-B24
Numerator: Number of deaths due to HIV disease
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to HIV Disease (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/17/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Kidney Disease: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    5.5
    95% Confidence Interval (3.1 - 7.9)
    State
    13.8
    U.S.
    13.3
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Kidney disease is the ninth leading cause of death among New Jersey residents and in the nation as a whole.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate due to kidney disease held steady from 2000-2009, declined between 2010 and 2013, then increased in 2014-2015. In New Jersey, nearly 1,600 deaths each year are due to kidney disease. The age-adjusted death rate due to kidney disease among Blacks is double that of other racial/ethnic groups in New Jersey. In the total population and among each racial/ethnic group, males have a higher death rate than females. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 5.5 in Hunterdon to a high of 17.8 in Burlington and Salem.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Kidney Disease

Definition: Deaths with nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis (kidney disease) as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: N00-N07, N17-N19, N25-N27
Numerator: Number of deaths due to kidney disease
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Kidney Disease (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/12/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Influenza and Pneumonia: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    12.4
    95% Confidence Interval (8.9 - 16.0)
    State
    12.1
    U.S.
    15.4
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Influenza and pneumonia combined are the tenth leading cause of death among New Jersey residents and eighth among all US residents.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate due to influenza and pneumonia has been generally declining for many years. In New Jersey, about 1,400 deaths each year are due to influenza and pneumonia. In the total population and among each racial/ethnic group, males have a higher death rate than females. The age-adjusted death rate due to influenza and pneumonia is significantly lower among Asians than among other racial/ethnic groups in New Jersey. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 9 in Morris to a high of 19 in Gloucester.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health has several programs that track influenza and pneumonia infections or that track and/or promote vaccination. Health care professionals are to immediately call in confirmed or suspected cases of influenza to the local health department. Vaccines for Children Program: [https://njiis.nj.gov/njiis/html/vfc.html]

Evidence-based Practices

Annual influenza vaccination is the most effective method for preventing influenza virus infection and its complications. Vaccination against pneumococcal disease has been effective in reducing infections among seniors and persons with certain medical conditions.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Influenza and Pneumonia

Definition: Deaths with influenza or pneumonia as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: J09-J18
Numerator: Number of deaths due to influenza and pneumonia
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Influenza and Pneumonia (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/13/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Septicemia (Sepsis): Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    10.9
    95% Confidence Interval (7.6 - 14.2)
    State
    17.1
    U.S.
    10.8
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Septicemia, commonly referred to as sepsis or "blood poisoning," is the seventh leading cause of death among New Jersey residents.

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted death rate due to septicemia is lower than it was a decade ago but appears to be on the rise again. In New Jersey, nearly 2,000 deaths each year are due to septicemia. In the total population and among each racial/ethnic group, males have higher death rates than females. The age-adjusted death rate due to septicemia is highest among Blacks in New Jersey. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 11 in Hunterdon to a high of 26 in Essex.

What Is Being Done?

Under state law, New Jersey hospitals are required to submit uniform data to the New Jersey Department of Health on health care facility-associated infections. The Department reviews and analyzes these data and reports the results in New Jersey's annual [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/submit-reporting/hais/index.shtml hospital performance report]. (Note that not all cases of septicemia are acquired in a healthcare setting.)

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Septicemia (Sepsis)

Definition: Deaths with septicemia as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: A40-A41
Numerator: Number of deaths due to septicemia
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Septicemia (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/10/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Stroke: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    25.9
    95% Confidence Interval (17.0 - 34.8)
    State
    31.1
    U.S.
    37.6
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in New Jersey and fifth in the US. It is third among women, as well as among Blacks and Asians. It is the fourth leading cause of death among men, as well as among Whites and Hispanics.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, over 3,000 deaths each year are due to stroke. The age-adjusted death rate due to stroke is steadily declining. Blacks have the highest age-adjusted death rate due to stroke and in all racial/ethnic groups, males have higher rates than females. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 25.9 in Hunterdon to a high of 51.0 in Cumberland.

What Is Being Done?

The NJDOH [http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/chronic/heart-disease-stroke/ Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention] (NJHDSP) Program works in partnership with public and private sector groups and organizations from health care, work site, and community settings to affect policy and systems level change. The NJHDSP Program strives to address all points of opportunity, from prevention of heart disease and stroke in healthy persons to controlling risk factors, treatment of illness and prevention of recurrence in those who have had an event, as well as issues related to rehabilitation, long-term, and end-of-life care. The Office of [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/cardiac-stroke-services/stroke-services/index.shtml Health Care Quality Assessment] maintains an Acute Stroke Registry and designates hospitals that meet certain standards as Primary or Comprehensive Stroke Centers.

Healthy People Objective HDS-3:

Reduce stroke deaths
U.S. Target: 34.8 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)
State Target: 28.6 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Stroke

Definition: Deaths with cerebrovascular disease (stroke) as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: I60-I69
Numerator: Number of deaths due to stroke
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Stroke (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/07/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Unintentional Injury: Deaths per 100,000 Standardized Population, 2015

  • Hunterdon
    36.1
    95% Confidence Interval (25.6 - 46.6)
    State
    33.7
    U.S.
    43.2
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Unintentional injury is the leading cause of deaths among persons aged 1-4 and 10-44 years and the fourth leading cause among all ages combined. Unintentional injuries are, for the most part, preventable.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, more than 3,000 deaths each year are due to unintentional injuries. These include poisonings, motor vehicle-related fatalities, falls, suffocation, drowning, fire and smoke-related injuries, and others. The age-adjusted death rate due to unintentional injury had been generally increasing in recent years with a rise in unintentional poisonings. In the total population and among each racial/ethnic group, males have much higher death rates than females. In New Jersey, the age-adjusted death rate due to unintentional injury is highest among White males. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 23 in Bergen to a high of 63 in Salem.

What Is Being Done?

The NJDOH was involved in a collaborative effort with other state and community agencies, culminating in the release of "[http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/documents/injury_prevention.pdf Preventing Injury in New Jersey: Priorities for Action]", a comprehensive set of recommendations for injury and violence prevention.

Healthy People Objective IVP-11:

Reduce unintentional injury deaths
U.S. Target: 36.4 deaths per 100,000 population

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Unintentional Injury

Definition: Deaths with unintentional injury as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: V01-X59, Y85-Y86 Unintentional injuries are commonly referred to as accidents and include poisonings (drugs, alcohol, fumes, pesticides, etc.), motor vehicle crashes, falls, fire, drowning, suffocation, and any other external cause of death.
Numerator: Number of deaths due to unintentional injury
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Unintentional Injury (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/10/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Motor Vehicle-Related Injuries: Deaths per 100,000 Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    4.9
    95% Confidence Interval (2.7 - 7.1)
    State
    6.2
    U.S.
    11.1
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Motor vehicle crashes are the 2nd leading cause of unintentional injury death in the United States and in New Jersey. Each year there are more than 260,000 motor vehicle crashes in New Jersey and one-quarter of crashes result in injuries.[http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/refdata/accident/ ^1^]

How Are We Doing?

Death rates due to motor vehicle-related injuries are on a slow downward trend in New Jersey and the United States dating back to the early 1990's. Rates do not vary much by race/ethnicity but they are very different for males and females with the rate among males 2.5 times that of females. Seventy percent of motor vehicle-related fatalities are among males. County rates vary from 3.8 per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) in Bergen County to 16.1 in Cumberland (2013-2015 data).

What Is Being Done?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's "[http://www.nhtsa.gov/CIOT Click It or Ticket]" campaign is the most successful seat belt enforcement campaign ever, helping achieve an all-time high national seat belt usage rate of 85 percent. New Jersey's laws to protect drivers, passengers, bicyclists, and pedestrians are among the most stringent in the nation. Across the U.S., states require [http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/childsafety_laws.html child safety seats] for infants and children fitting specific criteria. In New Jersey, the requirement is for children under 8 years old or shorter than 57" and the safety seat should be in the rear seat, if available. Like most states, New Jersey also requires booster seats or other appropriate devices for children who have outgrown their child safety seats but are still too small to use an adult seat belt safely. New Jersey and only a handful of other states require the use of seat belts on school buses. New Jersey is the only state that [http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/license_laws.html requires drivers to reach the age of 17] before being allowed to drive unsupervised. It is also one of only 8 states (plus D.C.) that does not allow full driving privileges until the age of 18. All states except Utah define [http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/impaired_laws.html drunk driving] as operating a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher. New Jersey and Pennsylvania have increased penalties if the driver's BAC is 0.10 or higher. Increased penalties (if any) in other states are not levied unless the driver's BAC is 0.15 or higher. New Jersey is one of 14 states (plus D.C.) with primary hand-held [http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/cellphone_laws.html cell phone bans], was one of the first states to enact [http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/helmet_laws.html motorcycle helmet laws], and is one of 5 states that require all bicyclists under 17 years of age to wear a [http://www.ghsa.org/state-laws/issues/Bicyclists-and-Pedestrians bike helmet].

Healthy People Objective IVP-13.1:

Reduce motor vehicle crash-related deaths: Deaths per 100,000 population
U.S. Target: 12.4 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)
State Target: 7.1 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)

Related Indicators

Risk Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

County is the decedent's county of residence, not the county where the injury occurred.

Data Sources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Compressed Mortality File. CDC WONDER On-line Database accessed at [http://wonder.cdc.gov/cmf-icd10.html]   Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Motor Vehicle-Related Injuries

Definition: Deaths with motor vehicle-related injury as the underlying cause of death. Motor vehicle-related deaths include motor vehicle and motorcycle drivers and passengers, pedestrians, and bicyclists struck by motor vehicles both on roadways in traffic and in other areas such as parking lots and driveways. ICD-10 codes: V02-V04, V09.0, V09.2, V12-V14, V19.0-V19.2, V19.4-V19.6, V20-V79, V80.3-V80.5, V81.0-V81.1, V82.0-V82.1, V83-V86, V87.0-V87.8, V88.0-V88.8, V89.0, V89.2
Numerator: Number of deaths due to motor vehicle-related injuries
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Motor Vehicle-Related Injuries (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/19/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Unintentional Poisoning: Deaths per 100,000 Population, 2014-2015

  • Hunterdon
    13.8
    95% Confidence Interval (9.2 - 18.4)
    State
    14.6
    U.S.
    14.0
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Every day in the U.S., an average of 130 people die as a result of unintentional poisoning and 4,100 others are treated in emergency departments. Unintentional poisoning deaths in the United States nearly quadrupled between 2000 and 2015.[http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html ^1^]

How Are We Doing?

In approximately 93% of unintentional poisoning deaths nationally and in New Jersey, drugs are the poison. This includes unintentional overdose, wrong drug given or taken in error, drug taken inadvertently, and mistakes in the use of drugs in medical and surgical procedures. Not included are cases where the correct drug was properly administered but had an unforeseen adverse effect such as an allergic reaction. There are a handful of alcohol poisoning and carbon monoxide poisoning deaths each year and even fewer due to exposure to other noxious substances. Although death rates due to drug overdose among Blacks and Hispanics rose and fell over the past decade and a half, the death rates for these two groups rose sharply from 2014 to 2015 (32% and 47%, respectively). The most noticeable rate change prior to the current year occurred in 2005-2006, due in part to an increase in the availability of high-purity heroin and heroin adulterated with fentanyl. The drug overdose death rate among Whites in 2014, however, was nearly triple the rate in 2000, and rose another 19% just from 2014 to 2015. The increase can be in large part attributed to an increased supply of and demand for heroin, heroin tainted with adulterants (including fentanyl), and an expanded prescription opioid diversion network and substance abuse base, especially among younger populations.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://nj.gov/health/integratedhealth/ Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services] promotes the prevention and treatment of substance disorders and supports the recovery of individuals affected by the chronic disease of addiction. In 2004, the New Jersey [http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2004/Bills/PL04/9_.HTM Patient Safety Act] (P.L. 2004, c.9) was signed into law. The statute was designed to improve patient safety in hospitals and other health care facilities by establishing a medical error reporting system. The [http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2012/Bills/PL13/46_.HTM Overdose Prevention Act] (P.L. 2013, c.46) was passed in 2013 to provide immunity from liability and professional discipline to health care professionals who prescribe, dispense, or administer naloxone, or any similarly acting drug approved for the treatment of an opioid overdose, in an emergency to an individual who the person believes is experiencing an opioid overdose. The Act also contains Good Samaritan provisions, which provide immunity from arrest and prosecution for drug possession to those non-health professional individuals who call 911 for suspected overdoses, and makes naloxone available to spouses, parents, and guardians who could be taught to administer the drug in case of an emergency. In 2014, the Health Commissioner expanded the scope of practice for Emergency Medical Technicians to allow for the administration of [http://www.nj.gov/health/ems/ems-toolbox/ naloxone] in cases of life threatening opioid overdoses. Later that spring, the Governor established a pilot program to train and equip police officers to administer naloxone; this program was expanded to every county in the state in June, 2014. A bill expanding the scope of the New Jersey Prescription Monitoring Program (NJPMP) was signed by the Governor in 2015, and requires all physicians and pharmacists practicing in New Jersey to register for access and mandates physicians to check the NJPMP when patients return for refills on opioid medications. In early 2017, the Governor signed a law ([http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2016/Bills/PL17/28_.HTM P.L. 2017, c.28]) setting a five-day limit on initial prescriptions for opioids (reduced from seven days) and mandating that insurance companies accept those facing drug addiction into treatment for up to six months and without the need for prior coverage authorization. In 2016, NJDOH was awarded a CDC grant for [https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/foa/ddpi.html Prescription Drug Overdose: Data-Driven Prevention Initiative] (DDPI), and funding will be used to advance and evaluate state-level actions to address opioid misuse, abuse, and overdose. Funds aim to help states improve data collection and analysis around opioid misuse, abuse, and overdose; develop strategies based on data that address the behaviors driving prescription opioid dependence and abuse; and work with communities to develop more comprehensive opioid overdose prevention programs. The New Jersey [http://nj.gov/health/ceohs/public-health-tracking/human-exposure/#1 Environmental Public Health Tracking] Program is collecting hospitalization data on unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning to better understand and track the impact of CO poisoning.

Healthy People Objective IVP-9.3:

Prevent an increase in the rate of poisoning deaths: Unintentional or undetermined intent among all persons
U.S. Target: 11.1 deaths per 100,000 population
State Target: is not comparable because it does not include poisoning deaths of undetermined intent

Data Sources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Compressed Mortality File. CDC WONDER On-line Database accessed at [http://wonder.cdc.gov/cmf-icd10.html]   Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Unintentional Poisoning

Definition: Deaths with unintentional poisoning by and exposure to noxious substances as the underlying cause of death. '''''This includes, but is not limited to, opioids and other drugs.'''''[[br]] ICD-10 codes: X40-X49 (includes poisoning by legal and illegal drugs, alcohol, gases and vapors such as carbon monoxide and automobile exhaust, pesticides, and other chemicals and noxious substances)
Numerator: Number of deaths due to unintentional poisoning
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Unintentional Poisoning (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

09/25/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Drug-Induced Deaths: Rate per 100,000 Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    12.0
    95% Confidence Interval (8.5 - 15.4)
    State
    15.4
    U.S.
    15.7
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Substance abuse affects all racial, ethnic, and income groups and results in substantial morbidity and mortality, as well as contributing to crime and other social and economic problems.

Healthy People Objective SA-12:

Reduce drug-induced deaths
U.S. Target: 11.3 deaths per 100,000 population

Related Indicators

Risk Factors:

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

These rates are based on death certificate data only. Death certificate cause of death coding does not give the necessary level of detail to show the contribution of each drug individually when multiple substances are involved, as is the case for a large proportion of drug poisoning deaths. 

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Drug-Induced Deaths

Definition: Drug-induced death causes include those with an underlying cause of drug overdoses, drug psychoses, drug dependence, various drug-induced diseases and disorders, non-dependent abuse of drugs other than alcohol or tobacco, finding of drugs in the blood, suicide by drugs, homicidal poisoning by any drug or medicament, or drug poisoning that is undetermined whether accidentally or purposefully inflicted. '''''This includes, but is not limited to, opioids.'''''
Numerator: The number of drug-induced deaths
Denominator: The total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Drug-Induced Causes (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

09/25/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Deaths due to Firearm-related Injury: Deaths per 100,000 Population, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    3.5
    95% Confidence Interval (2.1 - 5.0)
    State
    5.4
    U.S.
    10.5
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Violence is a major public health concern throughout the United States.

How Are We Doing?

The firearm-related age-adjusted death rate in 2015 was 32% higher than in 2000. The rate among Blacks is 5 times the rate among Whites and 9 times the rate among Hispanics. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from a low of 2.0 in Bergen to a high of 14.2 in Essex (2011-2015). In recent years, the homicide rate among males aged 15-19 years, has not changed much in the US but it has declined in New Jersey. The rate among young Black males is nearly 5 times the rate among young Hispanic males.

What Is Being Done?

New Jersey already has some of the strictest firearm laws in the nation. In January, 2017, the Governor signed into law a revision of certain existing laws concerning domestic violence and firearms ([http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/bills/BillView.asp?BillNumber=S2483 P.L.2016, c.91]), which enhances protections for domestic violence victims by restricting access to firearms by a person convicted of a domestic violence crime or subject to a domestic violence restraining order. For female homicide victims, more than half of homicides are committed by a current or former intimate partner, and a majority of those deaths involve a firearm.[http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njvdrs/ ^1^] The Governor's Study Commission on Violence released a report of recommendations to the Governor on ways to combat all types of violence from a public health perspective in October, 2015. The New Jersey Department of Health maintains the [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njvdrs/ New Jersey Violent Death Reporting System] (NJVDRS), a CDC-funded surveillance system that tracks suicides, homicides, unintentional firearm deaths, injury deaths of undetermined intent, and deaths by legal intervention and is used to educate public health and public safety professionals in the state and inform their interventions and decision-making, with the ultimate goal of reducing the incidence of violent deaths. NJVDRS is part of the [https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/nvdrs/index.html National Violent Death Reporting System], which now funds 40 states.

Healthy People Objective IVP-30:

Reduce firearm-related deaths
U.S. Target: 9.3 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)
State Target: 4.7 deaths per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

County is the decedent's county of residence, not the county where the injury occurred.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Deaths due to Firearm-related Injury

Definition: Deaths with a firearm-related injury as the underlying cause of death. ICD-10 codes: W32-W34 (unintentional), X72-X74 (suicide), X93-X95 (homicide), Y22-Y24 (undetermined intent), Y35.0 (legal intervention)
Numerator: Number of deaths due to firearm-related injuries of all intentions
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Firearm-related Injury (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/19/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Homicide: Deaths per 100,000 Population, 2011-2015

  • Hunterdon
    **
    95% Confidence Interval (0.0 - 1.0)
    State
    4.7
    U.S.
    5.3
    ** Number too small to calculate a reliable rate.
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Violence is a major public health problem in the United States. Among persons aged 15 to 29 years of age, homicide is the second leading cause of death in New Jersey and third in the U.S.

How Are We Doing?

In New Jersey, there are approximately 400 homicides per year. Homicide victims are predominantly male, accounting for over 80% of homicides in New Jersey. Firearms are used in two-thirds of homicides. The age-adjusted homicide rate in New Jersey has remained between 4 and 6 per 100,000 population for the past decade, and after declining steadily from 2006 to 2009, the rate is currently on the upswing. This is primarily due to a dramatic increase in homicides in urban settings, coinciding with increased drug trade. Homicide rates among one high-risk group (black males, ages 15-19), as identified in Healthy New Jersey (HNJ), have been decreasing since 2006, but there has been a corresponding uptick in homicide rates among black males, 20-34. These two groups are the main drivers of the statewide homicide rate.

What Is Being Done?

The Governor's Study Commission on Violence released a report of recommendations to the Governor on ways to combat all types of violence from a public health perspective in October, 2015. The New Jersey Department of Health maintains the [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njvdrs/ New Jersey Violent Death Reporting System] (NJVDRS), a CDC-funded surveillance system that tracks suicides, homicides, unintentional firearm deaths, injury deaths of undetermined intent, and deaths by legal intervention and is used to educate public health and public safety professionals in the state and inform their interventions and decision-making, with the ultimate goal of reducing the incidence of violent deaths. NJVDRS is part of the [https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/nvdrs/index.html National Violent Death Reporting System]. The New Jersey [http://www.nj.gov/dcf/providers/boards/fatality/ Child Fatality and Near-Fatality Review Board] and the New Jersey [http://www.nj.gov/dcf/providers/boards/dvfnfrb/ Domestic Violence Fatality and Near-Fatality Review Board] meet regularly to discuss possible systemic issues relating to incidents involving children and certain legally defined domestic relationships.

Healthy People Objective IVP-29:

Reduce homicides
U.S. Target: 5.5 homicides per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)
State Target: 4.3 homicides per 100,000 population (age-adjusted)

Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics:

Health Status Outcomes:


Note

County is the decedent's county of residence, not the county where the assault occurred.

Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Homicide

Definition: Deaths where homicide is indicated as the underlying cause of death. Homicide is defined as death resulting from the intentional use of force or power, threatened or actual, against another person, group, or community. ICD-10 Codes: X85-Y09, Y87.1 (homicide)
Numerator: Number of resident deaths due to homicide
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Homicide (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/13/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov




Suicide: Deaths per 100,000 Population, 2013-2015

  • Hunterdon
    9.6
    95% Confidence Interval (6.5 - 12.7)
    State
    8.2
    U.S.
    13.0
  • Hunterdon Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Gauge

    Description of the Gauge

    This graphic is based on the county data to the left. It compares the county value of this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The county's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The county's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The county's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The county value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the county's 95% confidence interval. If the county's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the county's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the county and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a county should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the county number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death among Americans and 11th among New Jerseyans. The average annual suicide count among New Jersey residents is nearly 800 and there are more than twice as many suicides as homicides in the state.

How Are We Doing?

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among New Jersey residents aged 10-29 years, second among those aged 30-34, fourth among those aged 35-49, and 11th among all ages. Suicide has been increasing in New Jersey in recent years, going from about 500 deaths in 2005 to 789 in 2015. The majority (60%) of suicides are White males and the age-adjusted death rate among this group is more than double that of any other racial/ethnic/sex group. County rates per 100,000 population (age-adjusted) range from 5.6 in Essex to 15.3 in Salem.

What Is Being Done?

In 2013, the [http://www.njhopeline.com/ NJ Hopeline Call Center] was launched to serve as a backup to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network during times of excess call volume or after the Lifeline Crisis Centers' operating hours.[1] The New Jersey [http://www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/New%20Jersey%202015-preventionplan.pdf Strategy for Youth Suicide Prevention 2015] was developed by community partners and the New Jersey Youth Suicide Prevention Advisory Council to guide the State's efforts to prevent youth suicides[2] and the [http://www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/New%20Jersey%20Adult%20Suicide%20Prevention%20Plan%20Final%202014-17.pdf Adult Suicide Prevention Plan 2014-2017] from the NJ Department of Human Services contains strategies and actions in addition to crisis responses for the specific concerns related to adult suicide.[3] The Governor's Study Commission on Violence [http://nj.gov/oag/newsreleases15/pr20151013a.html released a report] of recommendations to the Governor on ways to combat all types of violence from a public health perspective in October, 2015. The New Jersey Department of Health maintains the [http://www.nj.gov/health/chs/njvdrs/ New Jersey Violent Death Reporting System] (NJVDRS), a CDC-funded surveillance system that tracks suicides, homicides, unintentional firearm deaths, injury deaths of undetermined intent, and deaths by legal intervention and is used to educate public health and public safety professionals in the state and inform their interventions and decision-making, with the ultimate goal of reducing the incidence of violent deaths. NJVDRS is part of the National Violent Death Reporting System, which now funds 42 states and territories. CHS has analyzed firearm suicides, adolescent suicides, and suicide among police officers in collaboration with the New Jersey State Attorney General's Office as part of the Governor's Task Force on Police Suicide. CHS was involved in a collaborative effort with other state and community agencies, culminating in the release of "[http://www.nj.gov/health/chs/documents/injury_prevention.pdf Preventing Injury in New Jersey: Priorities for Action]", a comprehensive set of recommendations for injury and violence prevention. Recommendations to prevent suicide included the development and implementation of community-based suicide prevention programs and to promote efforts to reduce access to lethal means and methods of self-harm, including firearm safety awareness.

Healthy People Objective MHMD-1:

Reduce the suicide rate
U.S. Target: 10.2 suicides per 100,000 (age-adjusted)
State Target: 5.9 suicides per 100,000 (age-adjusted)

Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics:

Risk Factors:


Data Sources

Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health   Population Estimates, State Data Center, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, [http://lwd.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html]  

Measure Description for Suicide

Definition: Deaths with suicide as the underlying cause. Suicide is defined as death resulting from the intentional use of force against oneself. ICD-10 codes: X60-X84, Y87.0
Numerator: Number of deaths due to suicide
Denominator: Total number of persons in the population

Indicator Profile Report

Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Suicide (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/13/2017

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: chs@doh.nj.gov

The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Thu, 14 December 2017 13:43:11 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

Content updated: Wed, 15 Nov 2017 07:52:40 EST