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Health Indicator Report of Hearing Loss Positive Screening Follow-Up

In the United States, approximately 1 to 3 of every 1,000 newborns are affected by significant hearing loss. Without newborn hearing loss screening, the average age of hearing loss detection is about 2 1/2 years of age which can affect the speech development and language acquisition of the child. Treatment for significant hearing loss is recommended prior to 6 months of age to avoid irreversible and permanent speech, language, and cognitive impairments.

Notes

This is Healthy New Jersey 2020 (HNJ2020) Objective MCH-13.

Data Sources

  • Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health
  • Early Identification and Monitoring Program, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health

Data Interpretation Issues

Audiologic follow-up includes pass results on outpatient re-screening exams.

Definition

Percentage of infants receiving audiologic follow-up after a positive screening for hearing loss by 3 months of age.

Numerator

Number of infants receiving audiologic follow-up after a positive screening for hearing loss by 3 months of age.

Denominator

Total number of infants who had a positive screening for hearing loss.

Healthy People Objective: Receipt of audiologic evaluation no later than age 3 months for infants who did not pass the hearing screening

U.S. Target: 72.6 percent
State Target: 80.0 percent

Other Objectives

Objective MCH-13: Increase the percentage of infants receiving audiologic follow-up after a positive screen for hearing loss by 3 months of age to 80%.

How Are We Doing?

Nearly 70% of infants received a audiologic follow-up after a positive screening for hearing loss by 3 months of age in 2014. This is more than double the proportion followed-up in 2002 when universal newborn hearing screening was mandated in New Jersey. Racial/ethnic disparities have decreased over time. In 2002, the rate among Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs) was 85% higher than the rate among Hispanics. In 2014, the difference has declined to 9%. Additionally, the rate among Whites has reached the level of that of APIs and the rate among Hispanics has slightly surpassed that of Blacks.

What Is Being Done?

New Jersey Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) program works to ensure that all New Jersey children receive timely and appropriate screening, diagnosis, and intervention for hearing loss.

Available Services

The NJDOH Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program's website offers information including - answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs) - a speech and hearing checklist - a search tool to find hearing health care providers - a glossary of terms - educational brochures in several languages - links to other websites with information for parents of deaf and hard of hearing children http://nj.gov/health/fhs/ehdi/index.shtml

Health Program Information

NJDOH Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program: http://nj.gov/health/fhs/ehdi/index.shtml
Page Content Updated On 08/02/2016, Published on 08/02/2016
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 11 December 2017 2:21:50 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

Content updated: Wed, 15 Nov 2017 07:52:42 EST